Rudy Giuliani, three other Trump allies subpoenaed in January 6 riot probe – CNBC

By |2022-01-18T19:21:37-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

The select House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riot on Tuesday issued subpoenas to Rudy Giuliani, another former lawyer for ex-President Donald Trump, and two other allies. The committee said that the new subpoenas were aimed at "four individuals who publicly promoted unsupported claims about the 2020 election and participated in attempts to disrupt or delay the certification of election results." Giuliani had led efforts for Trump after that election to challenge results in individual states that showed President Joe Biden had won. The panel also issued a subpoena to the attorney Jenna Ellis, who assisted the former New York City mayor Giuliani in that fight. Sidney Powell, another controversial pro-Trump lawyer, and Boris Epshteyn, an ally of the former president, were the other two subpoena targets. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, personal attorney to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 7, 2020. Eduardo Munoz | Reuters The select House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol riot on Tuesday issued subpoenas to Rudy Giuliani, another former lawyer for ex-President Donald Trump, and two other allies. The subpoenas add to a raft of demands for interviews and evidence that the House panel has already issued to people in Trump's orbit, a number of whom have resisted cooperating. The committee said that the new subpoenas were aimed at four people, Giuliani, the attorneys Jenna Ellis and Sidney Powell, and Trump associate Boris Epshteyn, "who publicly promoted unsupported claims about the 2020 election and participated in attempts to disrupt or delay the certification of election results." The Jan. 6, 2021, invasion of the Capitol by a mob of Trump supporters was the culmination of his claim that he had actually won the election. The former New York mayor Giuliani had led efforts for Trump after the election to challenge results in individual states that showed President Joe Biden had won. Giuliani's law license was suspended in New York and Washington, D.C., for what a disciplinary panel in New York called his "false and misleading statements" about the election results. CNBC Politics Read more of CNBC's politics coverage: Ellis assisted Giuliani in that effort, and "reportedly prepared and circulated two memos purporting to analyze the constitutional authority for the Vice President [Mike Pence] to reject or delay counting electoral votes from states that had submitted alternate slates of electors," the committee said in a press release. Powell, "actively promoted claims of election fraud on behalf of former President Trump in litigation and public appearances," the committee said. Sidney Powell, an attorney later disavowed by the Trump campaign, participates in a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani at the Republican National Committee headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington, November 19, 2020. Jonathan Ernst | Reuters And Epshteyn "reportedly attended meetings at the Willard Hotel in the days leading up to January 6th and had a call with former President Trump on the morning of January 6th to discuss options to delay the certification of election results in the event of Vice President Pence's unwillingness to deny or delay the certification." Committee Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss, said, "The four individuals we've subpoenaed today advanced unsupported theories about election fraud, pushed efforts to overturn the election results, or were in direct contact with the former President about attempts to stop the counting of electoral votes." "We expect these individuals to join the nearly 400 witnesses who have spoken with the Select Committee as the committee works to get answers for the American people about the violent attack on our democracy," Thompson said. WATCH LIVEWATCH IN THE APP

Most Colorado House Republicans vote for supporting Jan. 6 crowd, election conspiracy theories

By |2022-01-18T18:20:46-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

DENVER – Only one Republican in Colorado’s House and Senate voted Tuesday in favor of Democratic-led resolutions urging Congress to pass new voting rights resolutions, while more than a dozen voted to approve failed amendments supporting those at the Capitol last Jan. 6 and conspiracy theories about the election.Several Republican House members offered amendments, which were rejected in the Democratic-led chamber, again falsely calling into question President Biden’s victory in the 2020 election, asking for more audits of Colorado’s elections systems, upholding former President Trump’s false claims about the election and election security, and offering support to Mesa County Clerk Tina Peters.Peters is under investigation by a grand jury and the secretary of state is seeking to remove her as the county’s designated election official again this year over her unsubstantiated election fraud claims and alleged tampering with the county’s election equipment.The Democratic led resolutions – HR22-1004 and SM22-001 – call on Congress, and specifically the Senate, to pass voting rights bills already passed in the House, including the John Lewis Voting Rights Accountability Act and the Freedom to Vote Act. They referenced Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and “his heroic efforts to advance voting rights.”The voting rights measures have stalled in the Senate because Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) have said they will not abolish the filibuster to pass the measures, and no Republican senators support them.The resolutions also call Colorado’s elections systems the nation’s “premier electoral system as a model for states” and say they worry about efforts across the country, primarily from Republicans, to restrict voting access, as well as about unproven conspiracy theories that have run rampant among some Republicans about the integrity of the 2020 election.All Colorado Democrats in both chambers who were present voted to approve the measures, while Sen. Kevin Priola, R-Henderson, was the lone Republican to approve either measure. None of the 24 House Republicans approved of the House resolution.“We will not stand by while states pass laws to suppress the vote and take us back to when people of color were denied their fundamental constitutional rights,” said Rep. Kerry Tipper, D-Lakewood, who was one of the prime sponsors of the House resolution.“Silence about the lies and conspiracies that were spread about the 2020 election is what led to the violent insurrection on Jan. 6,” said Rep. Tony Exum, D-Colorado Springs, another prime sponsor.In a statement as discussion about the measures was ongoing, House Minority Leader Hugh McKean, R-Loveland, said the results of the last election “are settled.”But he and other Republicans introduced amendments either contradicting that statement or feeding into the notion that there are irregularities with votes and elections. McKean did say Tuesday that “Joe Biden won the election in 2020.”But he also offered an amendment that sought to add language that Colorado should “commit to ensuring that dead people are removed from the voter rolls and that those who are unlawfully present in the United States are never able to vote in Colorado elections.” Twenty-two Republicans voted to approve it, but the amendment failed.“States like Colorado with respected voting systems can shine because state law – not partisan federal edicts – determines how these systems work,” McKean said in a statement. “The last thing we need is the federal government stepping in and nationalizing voting procedures.”Colorado GOP Chairwoman Kristi Burton Brown called the resolutions from Democrats distractions from issues Republicans would like voters to focus on and said the Republican party has “complete confidence that we will win this upcoming election.”Rep. Ron Hanks, R-Penrose, who is running for the GOP nomination to face U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) in November and who attended the Jan. 6 rally at the U.S. Capitol and tried to force McKean out as minority leader last year, offered an amendment that sought a forensic audit of the 2020 and 2021 elections in Colorado like he has backed in Arizona, which found no irregularities.It also contained language about warning others about using Dominion Voting Systems, referencing China and he claimed were “not secure” and about pushing legislatures in various states “to control the conduct of elections in their states” – a nod to the idea that legislatures could determine their own slate of electors who could vote in defiance of a state’s popular vote.The amendment, too, was rejected, but 19 Republicans voted in favor of its passage.Rep. Dave Williams, R-Colorado Springs, who is challenging incumbent Congressman Doug Lamborn this year, offered two amendments that were rejected.One sought to push more forensic audits while asking to “call into question the legitimacy of Joseph R. Biden to be president,” for all of Colorado to stop using Dominion Voting Systems, to “offer our support” to the under-investigation Peters, and to “urge the decertification of election results” in states where enough has been found to change the election outcome in Trump’s favor. Fifteen Republicans voted in favor of the amendment.His other amendment sought to thank Rep. Hanks and others who joined him for the Capitol events on Jan. 6 and to commit to removing dead voters from voter rolls and barring undocumented immigrants from voting. The amendment was also rejected but was approved by 16 Republicans.In Colorado, people who are not U.S. citizens are not allowed to vote. The only publicized case of voter fraud that has been charged in Colorado stemming from the 2020 election involves Barry Morphew, who is accused of voting for Donald Trump on his wife’s ballot, whom he has been accused of killing.There have only been a handful of other voter fraud cases confirmed over the past five years.A Colorado Springs woman pleaded guilty in early September 2017 to voter fraud and forgery for casting a vote in her deceased mother’s name in 2013. And Tony Lee Newbill, of Golden, pleaded guilty in February 2017 to voting on her dead father’s ballot.In December 2017, former Colorado GOP Chairman Steve Curtis was convicted of voter fraud and forgery for signing his ex-wife’s mail-in ballot for her. He was sentenced in February to four years of probation.In 2019, a Mesa County woman pleaded guilty to voting twice in an election in 2018 after she cast a mail ballot for her son, who voted in person at his university as well. The charge was dismissed in April 2020 after she completed her probation successfully.In an interview Tuesday, Secretary of State Jena Griswold, who sued Peters earlier Tuesday seeking to remove her as Mesa County’s designated election official, condemned those Republicans who applauded the resolution standing with Peters. Peters has said the newly formed grand jury would prove her innocence.Griswold, who is up for reelection this year as Republicans try to re-take any of the statewide seats and seats in the legislature, has been among the nation’s loudest voices in pushing back against Trump’s false election fraud claims and has become a foil for Republicans in Colorado seeking to push the idea there are problems with Colorado’s elections and mail-in ballots.“I think the showing of today from the legislature does show that the Big Lie is growing bigger, it’s here in Colorado, it’s across the nation. And its intent is to suppress the vote, chip away at confidence, and undermine election infrastructure,” Griswold said.“Ultimately, my job is to make sure that there’s sufficient oversight of Colorado’s elections during a really trying time when we are seeing attacks on elections and attacks on the right to vote really take hold across the nation. That’s my job, and that’s what I’m going to do,” she added. “…For me, the vitriol, the name calling, that’s not what’s going to drive my decision-making. What’s going to drive my decision making is the simple principle that every Colorado voter should have access to safe and secure elections, and I’ll do everything in my power to make that happen while I’m secretary of state.”The committee investigating the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol issued subpoenas Tuesday for Colorado-based attorney Jenna Ellis, Rudy Giuliani, Sidney Powell and Boris Epshteyn regarding their advancing of “unsupported theories about election fraud [and] pushed efforts to overturn the election results,” according to committee chairman Bennie Thompson.

Jan. 6 committee subpoenas Giuliani, 3 other Trump allies, accuses them of pushing election lies

By |2022-01-18T18:20:48-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol issued subpoenas Tuesday to Rudy Giuliani and three other allies of former President Donald Trump involved in efforts to overturn the 2020 election results.The committee said Giuliani, Jenna Ellis, Sidney Powell and Boris Epshteyn "publicly promoted unsupported claims about the 2020 election and participated in attempts to disrupt or delay the certification of election results.""The four individuals we’ve subpoenaed today advanced unsupported theories about election fraud, pushed efforts to overturn the election results, or were in direct contact with the former President about attempts to stop the counting of electoral votes," Committee Chair Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., said in a statement.The committee said in a news release that Giuliani "actively promoted claims of election fraud on behalf of the former President and sought to convince state legislators to take steps to overturn the election results. He was reported to have been in contact with then-President Trump and various Members of Congress regarding strategies for delaying or overturning the results of the 2020 election."Powell, Thompson said in a letter, also promoted election fraud claims and was reported to have "urged President Trump to direct the seizure of voting machines around the country to find evidence that foreign adversaries had hacked those machines and altered the results of the election."Ellis, the committee said, "reportedly prepared and circulated two memos purporting to analyze the constitutional authority for the Vice President to reject or delay counting electoral votes," while Epshteyn reportedly "had a call with former President Trump on the morning of January 6th to discuss options to delay the certification of election results in the event of Vice President Pence’s unwillingness to deny or delay the certification."Dareh Gregorian is a politics reporter for NBC News.Haley TalbotHaley Talbot is an associate producer in the NBC News Washington bureau.

Rudy Giuliani and 3 Others Subpoenaed by Jan. 6 Inquiry – The New York Times

By |2022-01-18T20:22:05-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

The House committee investigating the Capitol riot called for documents and testimony from Rudolph W. Giuliani and other members of President Donald J. Trump’s legal team.WASHINGTON — The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol on Tuesday subpoenaed Rudolph W. Giuliani and other members of the legal team that pursued a set of conspiracy-filled lawsuits on behalf of former President Donald J. Trump in which they made unsubstantiated claims of fraud in the 2020 presidential election.In addition to Mr. Giuliani, Mr. Trump’s personal lawyer and a ringleader of the group, the panel subpoenaed three others who played central roles in his effort to use the courts, state legislatures and Congress to try to overturn his defeat.Jenna Ellis drafted a memo on how Mr. Trump could invalidate the election results by exploiting an obscure law. Sidney Powell, a lawyer who worked on many of the lawsuits with Mr. Giuliani, ran an organization that raised millions of dollars based on false claims that election machines were rigged. Boris Epshteyn pursued allegations of election fraud in Nevada and Arizona and is said to have participated in a call with Mr. Trump on the morning of Jan. 6, “during which options were discussed to delay the certification of election results,” the committee said.“The four individuals we’ve subpoenaed today advanced unsupported theories about election fraud, pushed efforts to overturn the election results or were in direct contact with the former president about attempts to stop the counting of electoral votes,” Representative Bennie Thompson, Democrat of Mississippi and the chairman of the committee, said in a statement.The subpoena to Mr. Giuliani, obtained by The New York Times, seeks all documents he has detailing the pressure campaign he and other Trump allies initiated targeting state officials; the seizure of voting machines; contact with members of Congress; any evidence to support the bizarre conspiracy theories pushed; and any arrangements for his attorney’s fees.The panel instructed the four witnesses to turn over documents and submit to an interview in February.The latest subpoenas came as the committee, which has interviewed nearly 400 witnesses, has issued a wide range of demands for records, including to banks and phone companies. On Tuesday, CNN reported that the committee had also obtained logs of phone calls and text messages belonging to the former president’s son Eric Trump and to Kimberly Guilfoyle, the girlfriend of another son, Donald Trump Jr. The logs do not reveal the content of the messages.A committee spokesman declined to comment on that report.For weeks after the election, Mr. Giuliani and his team — which Ms. Ellis described as an “elite strike force” — promoted baseless claims of voter fraud through failed lawsuits, news conferences, media appearances and meetings with lawmakers.The committee said in a letter to Mr. Giuliani that its investigation had revealed “credible evidence” that he participated in attempts to “disrupt or delay the certification of the election results,” persuade state legislators to “take steps to overturn the election results” and urge Mr. Trump to order the seizure of voting machines.Mr. Giuliani claimed fraud at a series of unofficial state legislative hearings, and even argued one election fraud case himself, in federal court in Philadelphia, where he suffered a decisive defeat.“Voters, not lawyers, choose the president,” the court declared at one point.On Jan. 6, speaking to a crowd of Trump supporters before the attack on the Capitol, Mr. Giuliani called for “trial by combat.” Later, as the building was under siege, he called lawmakers in an attempt to delay the certification of Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s victory.“Senator Tuberville, or I should say Coach Tuberville, this is Rudy Giuliani, the president’s lawyer,” Mr. Giuliani said in a voice mail message intended for Senator Tommy Tuberville, Republican of Alabama, but mistakenly left on the phone of Senator Mike Lee, Republican of Utah. “I’m calling you because I want to discuss with you how they’re trying to rush this hearing and how we need you, our Republican friends, to try to just slow it down.”Ms. Ellis, the committee said, “prepared and circulated” two memos analyzing the constitutional authority for former Vice President Mike Pence to reject or delay counting electoral votes from states where Mr. Trump’s allies had attempted to arrange for the submission of an alternate slate of electors. In the memos, obtained by Politico, Ms. Ellis advised that Mr. Pence had the authority to not count electoral votes from six states in which the Trump campaign falsely alleged there was widespread fraud.Ms. Powell was among the leading promoters of some of the most far-fetched and fantastical claims of widespread voter fraud, including a bizarre conspiracy theory alleging a vast plot by China, Venezuela and the financier George Soros to hack into Dominion Voting Systems machines to flip votes away from Mr. Trump to Mr. Biden.She, too, urged Mr. Trump to seize voting machines, according to the committee.In December, Mr. Trump considered naming Ms. Powell to be a special counsel overseeing an investigation of voter fraud, even after his campaign had sought to distance itself from her as she aired wild and baseless claims about Dominion voting machines.Her organization, Defending the Republic, raised $14.9 million between December 2020 and July. Ms. Powell’s group has more than $9.3 million in funds on hand, according to an independent audit filed with Florida, which investigated the organization and alleged multiple violations of state law.Mr. Epshteyn reportedly attended planning meetings at the Willard Hotel in the days leading up to Jan. 6, the committee said. The panel, citing reporting from The Guardian, said he also participated in a call with Mr. Trump the morning of Jan. 6 that included a discussion of Mr. Pence’s “unwillingness to deny or delay the certification.”Key Figures in the Jan. 6 InquiryCard 1 of 14The House investigation.

Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Rudy Giuliani, Sidney Powell | TheHill

By |2022-01-18T18:20:53-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

The subpoena goes after the core of Trump’s legal team after the Nov. 3 election, a group that prepared legal arguments following his loss and pushed his baseless claims of election fraud alongside campaign efforts focused on the congressional certification on Jan. 6. “The Select Committee is looking into the causes that contributed to the violence on January 6th, including attempts to promote unsupported claims of election fraud and pressure campaigns to overturn the 2020 election results. The four individuals we’ve subpoenaed today advanced unsupported theories about election fraud, pushed efforts to overturn the election results, or were in direct contact with the former President about attempts to stop the counting of electoral votes,” Chair Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonTrump lawyers to Supreme Court: Jan. 6 committee 'will not be harmed by delay' GOP's McCarthy has little incentive to work with Jan. 6 panel GOP Rep. Katko, who voted to impeach Trump, won't run for reelection MORE (D-Miss.) said in a statement.The subpoena to Giuliani, a former New York City mayor and close Trump adviser throughout his presidency, focuses both on his ability to offer insight into the former president state of mind in the days surrounding Jan. 6 as well as his work pushing claims of election fraud in appearances on television and in court rooms across the country.“You actively promoted claims of election fraud on behalf of former President Trump and sought to convince state legislators to take steps to overturn the election results,” the committee wrote in its subpoena to Giuliani. ADVERTISEMENTThe subpoena also notes that he “urged President Trump to direct the seizure of voting machines around the country after being told that the Department of Homeland Security had no lawful authority to do so.”Giuliani was often considered a liability to the campaign, staging a press conference at the oddly-chosen Four Seasons Total Landscaping while at another press conference observers were distracted as some hair-darkening agent dripped down the side of his face.His law license was temporarily suspended in New York in June as a result of making false claims about the election at those press conferences as to judges as he sought to challenge election results. Giuliani’s attorney did not immediately respond to request for comment.Ellis and Powell were also members of what Ellis called an “elite strike force team” assembled in November to combat Biden’s electoral victory.ADVERTISEMENTMuch like with Giuliani, the subpoenas to the two women focus on false statements they made.Ellis’s, however, references her work in formulating the strategy used on Jan. 6, writing that she “prepared and circulated two memos purporting to analyze the constitutional authority for the Vice President to reject or delay counting electoral votes from states that had submitted alternate slates of electors.”The committee has already subpoenaed another who helped craft the memos, attorney John Eastman.Updated 6:00 p.m.

House Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Rudy Giuliani and other Trump allies who challenged 2020 …

By |2022-01-18T18:20:54-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

Associated Press Jan. 18, 2022 2:22 PM PT WASHINGTON — House Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Rudy Giuliani and other Trump allies who challenged 2020 election defeat. Newsletter Top headlines by email, weekday mornings Get top headlines from the Union-Tribune in your inbox weekday mornings, including top news, local, sports, business, entertainment and opinion. You may occasionally receive promotional content from the San Diego Union-Tribune.

After Lawsuit Against MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Here's Who Dominion And Smartmatic … – Forbes

By |2022-01-18T17:21:54-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

ToplineVoting machine company Smartmatic sued MyPillow and its CEO Mike Lindell for defamation Tuesday, bringing the total number of lawsuits it and rival company Dominion Voting Systems have filed over baseless election fraud claims about their voting machines to 11. Here’s everyone who has been sued so far, and who could face litigation next: Key Facts Smartmatic sued Lindell and MyPillow for defamation and deceptive trade practices in federal court, alleging the CEO spread “lies” about the company and “intentionally stoked the fires of xenophobia and party-divide for the noble purpose of selling his pillows.” Smartmatic previously sued One America News Network (OANN) in federal court and Newsmax in Delaware state court in November, alleging both networks “reported a lie” and spread fraud claims about the company—whose machines were only used in California in 2020—knowing they were false. Smartmatic filed its first lawsuit in February against far-right attorneys Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, Fox News and several of its anchors in New York state court, which alleges the defendants “engaged in a conspiracy to spread disinformation about Smartmatic” and “knowingly and intentionally” lied about the company. Denver-based Dominion sued OANN and anchors Chanel Rion and Christina Bobb in federal court and Newsmax in Delaware state court in August, alleging the two far-right networks promoted fraud allegations on their network knowing they were false and “​​helped create and cultivate an alternate reality where up is down, pigs have wings, and Dominion engaged in a colossal fraud to steal the presidency from Donald Trump by rigging the vote.” Dominion sued former Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne, who has become known for spreading election conspiracy theories after stepping down from Overstock in 2019, alleging the businessman “manufactured and promoted fake evidence to convince the world that the 2020 election had been stolen” using Dominion voting machines, and accused him of doing so in order to boost his own investments in blockchain voting technology. Dominion filed its first lawsuit in January against pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell, who has been the most prominent person spreading the fraud claims, seeking $1.3 billion in damages. It filed suit later in the month against Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani, alleging he used the conspiracy theory about Dominion’s machines to personally “enrich himself” while knowing the claims were false. Dominion made similar allegations against Lindell, suing the businessman and his company in February and claiming the CEO “sells the lie” involving the company’s voting machines “because the lie sells pillows.” Dominion sued Fox News in March alleging the network had knowingly spread false news about its machines to improve failing ratings, saying they had “set out to lure viewers back...by intentionally and falsely blaming Dominion” for President Donald Trump’s loss. What To Watch For Dominion has identified more than 150 people as potential targets of litigation, and it has sent letters to preserve evidence and warning of potential litigation to right-wing figures including pro-Trump attorney Lin Wood, Fox News anchors and Melissa Carone, who Giuliani has promoted as a witness to supposed voter fraud efforts. The company sent letters to social media networks in February asking them to preserve posts from Trump and his campaign, as well as from Trump allies including former Trump advisor Michael Flynn, Fox anchor Jeanine Pirro, Trump campaign attorney Jenna Ellis and far-right political commentator Dan Bongino. Dominion attorney Stephen Shackelford confirmed to reporters in August the company is still considering bringing additional lawsuits, saying the company is “still exploring options” as to how to hold others accountable and has “not ruled out other parties.” Big Number $1.6 billion. That’s approximately how much Dominion is asking for in damages against Byrne, OANN, Newsmax and Fox News. Its lawsuits against Powell, Giuliani and Lindell are each seeking $1.3 billion in damages. Smartmatic’s Fox News lawsuit is seeking $2.7 billion in damages, but its OANN, Newsmax and Lindell complaints do not specify exact figures. Chief Critics Those sued have largely remained defiant, and Newsmax said in a statement Wednesday the network “reported accurately on allegations made by well-known public figures.” Newsmax has argued both Dominion and Smartmatic’s lawsuits are “a clear attempt to squelch the rights of a free press.” Fox News said in a statement after it was sued the network “is proud of our 2020 election coverage” and would “vigorously defend” themselves against the litigation, Giuliani said the lawsuit against him was “another act of intimidation by the hate-filled left-wing” and Lindell said he “welcomed” Dominion’s lawsuit, telling Forbes before it was filed, “Dominion, please sue me.” Powell, Giuliani, Lindell and Fox News have all filed to dismiss their lawsuits, though a federal judge rejected Powell, Giuliani and Lindell’s motions in August. Key Background The companies’ voting machines are at the heart of a right-wing conspiracy theory alleging they were used to fraudulently flip votes from Trump to Joe Biden, which is not substantiated by evidence. Dominion says that the claims have substantially hurt its business and put its employees in danger. The voting company controls about 30% of the U.S. market, according to data cited by ProPublica in 2019—making it the second-largest business of its kind in the country—and said in its Fox News lawsuit that it has contracts with 28 states. Business analytics firm Dun & Bradstreet estimated the company’s 2021 annual revenue will be $40.15 million, though the company alleges it has lost out on state contracts over the fraud claims, including a $10 million contract in Stark County, Ohio, and a $100 million contract in Louisiana. London-based Smartmatic’s machines were only used in Los Angeles County in the 2020 election, though CEO told Antonio Mugica told Forbes the company has ambitions to expand further in the U.S. The company alleged in its complaints Wednesday the fraud claims have caused Smartmatic to lose more than $2 billion in valuation since the 2020 election, going from more than $3 billion to less than $1 billion, though Forbes has independently valued Smartmatic at an estimated $730 million. Further Reading Voting Company Smartmatic Sues MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell For Defamation (Forbes) Voting Company Smartmatic Sues One America News And Newsmax For Defamation Over Election Fraud Claims (Forbes) Dominion Sues Newsmax, OANN And Ex-Overstock CEO Byrne In New Defamation Suits Over Election Conspiracy Theory (Forbes) Dominion Voting Sues Sidney Powell For Defamation Over Election Conspiracy—And Others May Be Next (Forbes) Dominion Voting Sues Rudy Giuliani For $1.3 Billion Over Election Conspiracy (Forbes) Dominion Voting Sues MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell For Defamation Over Election Conspiracy (Forbes)

Colorado Republicans vote to thank Jan. 6 crowd, support Tina Peters and question Joe …

By |2022-01-18T17:21:56-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

Two-thirds of Colorado House GOP members voted Tuesday in favor of formally thanking state Rep. Ron Hanks and those who joined him at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol.A majority of House Republicans also voted to “call into question” whether Joe Biden was legitimately elected; to urge the decertification of 2020 election results in an effort to reinstall former President Donald Trump; to support embattled Mesa County Clerk and Recorder Tina Peters, an ally of election deniers who is under investigation for allegedly allowing a security breach in her elections division; and to commit to ensuring dead people are removed from voter rolls — something for which there is already a process in Colorado. Each of these proposals came as amendments to HR22-1004, a resolution brought by Colorado Democrats who want to urge Congress to adopt voting rights legislation. Democrats control the House and easily defeated each Republican amendment, ultimately passing the resolution on strict party lines. Lawmakers often jokingly refer to resolutions as “letters to Santa” — that is, messages that will never land. That’s surely the case here, as the Democrats have no apparent path to passing voting rights legislation without abolishing the filibuster. Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona have made clear they will not support that action. And so the Colorado resolution functions mainly as a chance for politicians to take a side, on record, on the matters of elections and voting rights. The resolution passed 20-13 in the Senate, with all Republicans but Henderson’s Kevin Priola voting no, and all Democrats voting yes. Hanks, a Fremont County Republican and candidate to challenge Democratic U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet in November, attended Trump’s rally on Jan. 6 and then marched to the U.S. Capitol, sparking a Colorado House Democrat to call for his removal early last year. He spoke well Tuesday of the people he met in D.C. “They were such nice people, Mr. Speaker,” he said. “These people did nothing wrong. They were afraid for their country.” The Republicans who voted for the amendment to support Hanks, which also called for the removal of dead people from voter rolls, were: Reps. Mark Baisley of Roxborough Park, Rod Bockenfeld of Watkins, Marc Catlin of Montrose, Richard Holtorf of Akron, Stephanie Luck of Penrose, Patrick Neville of Castle Rock, Rod Pelton of Cheyenne Wells, Andres Pico of Colorado Springs, Janice Rich of Grand Junction, Shane Sandridge of Colorado Springs, Matt Soper of Delta, Tonya Van Beber of Eaton, Kevin Van Winkle of Highlands Ranch, Perry Will of New Castle, Dave Williams of Colorado Springs and Dan Woog of Erie. Representatives who voted against were House Minority Leader Hugh McKean of Loveland, Mary Bradfield of Colorado Springs, Terri Carver of Colorado Springs, Colin Larson of Littleton and Mike Lynch of Wellington. Hanks recused himself from the vote, and Tim Geitner of Colorado Springs and Kim Ransom of Douglas County were both excused from the vote. The speaker, Democrat Alec Garnett of Denver, shouted from the House lectern after all the Republican amendments were defeated. “In Colorado, we cannot remain silent! Did you see those amendments? The choice is clear! The choice is clear, between the two groups of elected representatives in this building today,” he said. “Holy moly. We cannot remain silent. We cannot remain silent. Colorado, America, listen up! This is serious. You are under threat. Your ability to vote is under threat.” McKean made clear how far apart he is from so many in that caucus when, toward the end of Tuesday’s debate, he said, “Folks, Joe Biden won the election in 2020, just like Donald Trump won it in 2016.” The minority leader allies himself with the relatively moderate flank of his party, which prompted Hanks and several others to unsuccessfully try to oust him from leadership after the last session. McKean stresses mainstream issues like taxes and public safety, always downplaying the extent to which election denialism and other far-right pursuits are factors in the caucus he leads. Prior to the vote, the House GOP sent out a statement slamming Democrats for bringing this resolution in the first place, calling it an “epic waste of everyone’s time” to relitigate the election. It is improper to spend time on this issue so soon after a holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., the statement read. King fought for voting rights before his assassination, and his family this year asked people not to celebrate the holiday unless and until Congress passes voting rights legislation. “We cannot celebrate Dr. King’s birthday while standing idly by,” Democratic Sen. Kerry Donovan of Vail said during the Senate’s much shorter and more reality-based discussion. “You cannot just tweet. You cannot just give a speech. You cannot just show up on a holiday and post a picture.”

Voting Company Smartmatic Sues MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell For Defamation – Forbes

By |2022-01-18T16:48:38-05:00January 18th, 2022|Election 2020|

ToplineVoting machine company Smartmatic filed a defamation lawsuit against MyPillow and its CEO Mike Lindell Tuesday for spreading false conspiracy theories about election fraud involving the company’s machines, the latest in a string of defamation suits Smartmatic and rival company Dominion Voting Systems have brought to counter the baseless claims. Key Facts Smartmatic sued Lindell and MyPillow in federal court for defamation and deceptive trade practices, alleging the CEO “intentionally stoked the fires of xenophobia and party-divide for the noble purpose of selling his pillows.” Lindell knowingly spread “lies” about Smartmatic’s machines being used to switch votes in the 2020 election “because he wants to be seen as a champion of a deceptive message that still sells,” Smartmatic alleged. There is no evidence of any widespread fraud involving Smartmatic’s machines, which were only used in Los Angeles County, California, in the 2020 election. Smartmatic alleged that because of Lindell’s claims, the company’s valuation has gone from being “in excess of $3.0 billion” before the 2020 election to less than $1 billion now (Forbes independently valued Smartmatic at $730 million based on its estimated 2020 sales, which the company disputes). Smartmatic is asking for an unspecified amount in monetary damages and attorneys fees, as well as for an order that would require Lindell and MyPillow to “retract their false statements and implications fully and completely.” Lindell’s attorney has not yet responded to a request for comment. Crucial Quote “Crazy like a fox. Mike Lindell knows exactly what he is doing, and it is dangerous,” the lawsuit alleges. “The country will sleep better at night knowing the judicial system holds people like Mr. Lindell accountable for spreading disinformation that deceives and harms others.” Chief Critic Lindell has refused to back down from his baseless claims of widespread election fraud despite the litigation being brought against him, and filed a lawsuit in June against Dominion and Smartmatic accusing the companies of “weaponizing the litigation process to silence political dissent and suppress evidence” of fraud. (Lindell voluntarily dismissed that lawsuit in December to instead file counterclaims in Dominion’s defamation lawsuit against him.) Key Background Smartmatic’s lawsuit against Lindell and MyPillow follows separate litigation the company has already brought against attorneys Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, Fox News and far-right news networks Newsmax and One America News Network (OANN). Dominion, whose machines have been the primary focus of the far-right conspiracy theories, sued Lindell and MyPillow in February, similarly alleging the CEO “sells the lie” about Dominion “because the lie sells pillows.” The company has also filed suit against Powell, Giuliani, Fox News, former Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne, Newsmax, OANN and several of its anchors. That litigation is all still pending, and Lindell, Powell and Giuliani’s motions to dismiss the lawsuits against them failed in August. Further Reading After Lawsuits Against Newsmax And OANN, Here’s Who Dominion And Smartmatic Have Sued So Far—And Who Could Be Next (Forbes) Dominion Voting Sues MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell For Defamation Over Election Conspiracy (Forbes) Voting Company Smartmatic Sues One America News And Newsmax For Defamation Over Election Fraud Claims (Forbes)

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