Lawyers Risk Their Law Licenses Helping Smarmy Politicians | Washington Monthly

By |2021-12-04T21:48:35-05:00December 4th, 2021|Election 2020|

Rudolph Giuliani, attorney for President Donald Trump, conducts a news conference at the Republican National Committee on lawsuits regarding the outcome of the 2020 presidential election on Thursday, November 19, 2020. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Images)

Maryland redistricting at center of special session as GOP fires – The Washington Post

By |2021-12-04T21:48:52-05:00December 4th, 2021|Election 2020|

One of the country’s most gerrymandered congressional maps is slated to be redrawn next week when Maryland lawmakers return to Annapolis, over the protests of Republicans who charge the proposed map still significantly favors Democrats.Debate over the lines comes as the legislature is poised to select a new state treasurer and take pivotal votes on parole reform, immigration and public transit.The General Assembly will convene for at least a week to decide — for the first time in modern history under a divided government — how the maps for the eight districts should be drawn.The lawmakers will do their work under watchful eyes from Washington, where Democrats are grasping to maintain control of Congress, and as other states across the country recast their maps. Republican-dominated legislatures have already started redrawing boundary lines that move toward tipping the scales of power in the U.S. House.“How’d I get so lucky?” Sen. Nancy J. King (D-Montgomery), a veteran of the process who is chairing the Senate Standing Committee on Reapportionment and Redistricting, said sarcastically as she contemplated the task before her.“There isn’t a pretty map,” she said. “I don’t care how you look at it. And we’ll never have one that everyone agrees with.”King said the Senate committee is expected to hold a hearing on the maps on Monday and ultimately will work alongside a House committee to hear testimony and vote on a map to be sent to the full legislature. She said she would be “very surprised, although there’s always a possibility” that changes would be made to the map that the Legislative Redistricting Advisory Commission selected.The Princeton Gerrymandering Project gave it an F for partisan fairness and geographic compactness, while awarding an A to the map produced by Gov. Larry Hogan’s (R) citizens’ commission.On Thursday, Hogan encouraged Marylanders to testify during the special session in support of the citizen commission’s map. He charged at a recent news conference that state Democrats intended “to do some of the worst gerrymandering in the country” and said he plans to veto the bill that outlines the new boundary lines.“We finally have the chance to restore fairness to our political system,” he said in a statement Thursday, “and the Annapolis party bosses are instead scheming to further erode the public trust with disgracefully gerrymandered maps. It is an embarrassment.”By contrast, top Democratic lawmakers on the legislative committee praised their proposed map earlier this month as offering more compact and contiguous districts compared to the current eyesore. But critics and Republicans have cast doubt on those claims.Todd Eberly, a political science professor at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, said the pressure to retain every possible Democratic advantage when control of the U.S. House is up for grabs next year likely outweighed the pressure to undo nakedly partisan gerrymandering.To retain the advantage, Eberly said that meant lawmakers still have to draw twisty-turny districts that, for the most part, are anything but compact. He described the newly proposed 3rd Congressional District as resembling “a bizarre and very painful comb that no one would want to use,” stretching from Montgomery County to the Susquehanna River.“I would say anyone who looks at 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 or 8 is going to chuckle a bit at the idea that we’ve made these more compact,” Eberly said. “They’re still nonsense districts drawn for a very specific purpose. You’re going to spin it however you’re going to spin it.”Helen Brewer, a legal analyst with the Princeton Gerrymandering Project, agreed, noting that it was apparent simply by looking at the strangely shaped districts that lawmakers sacrificed compactness for partisan advantage. She noted that the project still took into account Maryland’s unique geography when doling out its F grade.Like the current map, seven of the eight districts would be safely Democratic in a state where, according to 2020 state voter registration data, approximately one-fourth of voters are registered Republicans. The map’s proposed 1st District — which would stretch across the Chesapeake Bay to include parts of blue Anne Arundel County — would likely be a toss-up, while the Princeton Project rates it as leaning ever so slightly Democratic.“In comparison to the citizens’ commission [map], it’s not apparent there is much of a reason to have these really outlandish shapes drawn when the map with those really wiggly shapes is the one producing an unfair partisan outcome,” Brewer said.Not all Democrats in Congress would support an 8-0 outcome. Rep. Kweisi Mfume (D-Md.) told a WBAL radio host earlier this month that he would not support efforts to inch toward an 8-0 map, fearing too many Marylanders’ political viewpoints risk being “locked out” of the democratic process. “If it were the other way around, and Democrats were one-third of the population,” Mfume said, “and they put forth maps or started moving toward an 8-0 representation, we’d be jumping up and down in arms.”Mfume on Thursday, though, declined to comment further on the proposal before the General Assembly, noting it was in the legislature’s hands and preferring to let the public hearings take their course.Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) said lawmakers’ proposed map underscored to him the need to pass the For the People Act, a measure Republicans filibustered in the Senate that would have required independent commissions to handle redistricting.Still, Raskin argued that pursuing a Democratic advantage in the Maryland map was necessary because Democrats could not afford to unilaterally disarm; Republicans control far more state legislatures in charge of redistricting than Democrats do.“I wish we had gotten out of the gerrymandering business. But these are the terms the Republican Party wants to fight on, so given that, we should do everything we can to maximize Democratic performance in Maryland as we have been gerrymandered into near oblivion in states like North Carolina, Ohio and Georgia,” Raskin said. “Democracy itself is at stake in the coming elections” — noting his lone Republican colleague, Harris, “sided with insurrectionists.”Eberly said that Democrats would still face an uphill climb to try to oust Harris under the proposal the General Assembly is considering. Although Trump won the district by more than 19 points in the 2020 election, Biden would have won the proposed district by just 0.3 percentage points.In a statement to The Washington Post, Harris said that he was pleased that at least the Eastern Shore was kept intact in the lawmakers’ proposal, he but lamented that the General Assembly sidestepped Hogan’s citizen commission.“I was hopeful that the General Assembly leadership would follow Gov. Hogan’s lead with a citizen-led nonpartisan redistricting process. Instead, we may have districts stretching from the Susquehanna River to Montgomery County that are called shared communities of interest,” he said, referring to the 3rd Congressional District.In addition to finalizing the new map, the legislature is expected to override Hogan’s veto of a measure that would strip the governor of his role in paroling inmates serving life sentences and a bill that would decriminalize needles, syringes and other drug paraphernalia.Lawmakers also would take up two immigration reform measures that would shut down the state’s privately-run centers that hold detainees for federal immigration officials and would ban the Motor Vehicle Administration from sharing personal information, including facial recognition data, with immigration officials.“These bills are going to change the lives of immigrants … Their lives are at risk,” said Jossie Flor Sapunar, a spokeswoman for CASA, a grass-roots immigrant advocacy group. “We can’t miss this moment.”Hogan vetoed about 20 bills during the regular session earlier this year, including measures on collective bargaining, greater investment in mass transit and legislative oversight of emergency procurement, that could be taken up. Lawmakers are also expected to select Del. Dereck E. Davis (D-Prince George’s), the chairman of the House Economic Matters Committee, as treasurer. Davis was recently recommended by a legislative panel to be considered for the position.Hogan also is calling on lawmakers to consider a package of emergency bills he recently proposed to contain the surging violence in Baltimore City. The bills call for stricter penalties for illegal gun possession and straw purchases — the buying of guns on behalf of people barred from owning them and a requirement that the sentences handed out by judges for violent offenders are tracked and published.Hogan said Senate President Bill Ferguson (D-Baltimore City) expressed concern about the surging crime but also conveyed reservations about taking the bills up during the special session.“I’m sure they are going to be working on trying to override some common sense vetoes that most people in Maryland agree with me on,” said Hogan, during a news conference last week on the coronavirus pandemic, without elaborating on where his mandate came from. “And I explained to him that they would be making a mistake if they go against the overwhelming will of the voters. I’m not sure if I convinced him on all of them.”

Arizona audit was fatally flawed from start to finish – Las Vegas Sun News

By |2021-12-04T21:48:53-05:00December 4th, 2021|Election 2020|

By Tim Steller Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021 | 2 a.m. The Steve Pierce Precedent — that is a clever way of explaining the most important Arizona political event of the year. Pierce was a Republican state senator representing District 1 from 2009 to 2017. He was Senate president for one full legislative session in 2012. But in November that year, then-Sen. Andy Biggs challenged Pierce and outflanked him from the political right, narrowly sneaking away with a majority of Republican senators to win the powerful Senate presidency. Sen. Karen Fann succeeded Pierce in office in 2017, and she also convinced her fellow Republicans to elect her Senate president. When then-President Donald Trump and his supporters pressured her hard to conduct a review of Maricopa County’s election, she went along, even though her equivalent in the other chamber, House Speaker Rusty Bowers, declined. Fann, it appears, did not want to end up outflanked on the right like Steve Pierce. That’s one of the key insights I drew from The Arizona Republic’s recent five-part series, measuring a whopping 27,000 words, that analyzed how the Cyber Ninjas’ so-called audit of Maricopa County’s 2020 election came to be and played out. Their reporting was derived in part from public records that the newspaper wrenched out of the Senate through a lawsuit. Meanwhile, from a different source, the latest report on the Cyber Ninjas’ performance by Tucsonan Benny White and others, we find the upshot of that “audit”: The Ninjas’ crucial count of the votes simply cannot be reconciled. White and his colleagues Larry Moore and Tim Halvorsen, who have dubbed themselves The Audit Guys, analyzed a Nov. 1 release of data from the Cyber Ninjas’ recount. They found that the Ninjas’ hand count of ballots, which took place over months at a Phoenix coliseum, quite literally does not add up. “We have used the official results and the Ninja database in numerous attempts to determine how they arrived at the vote totals they announced at their Sept. 24, 2021, press conference in the Arizona Senate chambers,” their report says. “We have tried dozens of ways to include and exclude various boxes and batches to arrive at those precise figures and have been unable to replicate their announced results.” As The Republic series shows, it was pressure from Trump himself, along with associates such as Rudy Giuliani and thousands of Trump’s followers, that convinced Fann to pursue a “forensic audit” of Maricopa County’s election. In the weeks after the election, Trump called Fann and Bowers more than once each, and Giuliani called and showed up, imploring them to overturn the election results or, barring that, to conduct an audit, because of all the evidence of fraud. Bowers demanded to see the evidence, but Fann went along, even as Giuliani’s promised evidence never appeared. History has already shown Bowers made the right choice. In an August deposition for a civil suit in which Giuliani is a defendant, he admitted that he did not have evidence for the claims he made. He just got information from social media or from what other people told him. “It’s not my job, in a fast-moving case, to go out and investigate every piece of evidence that was given to me. Otherwise, you’re never going to write a story. You’ll never come to a conclusion,” Giuliani said in the deposition. While Bowers and Fann originally discussed bringing in a qualified election auditor to review Maricopa County’s election, Fann eventually followed Giuliani and others into the world of Trump supporters who wanted to overturn the election and claimed to have a way to do it, in the name of “election integrity.” She hired the firm Cyber Ninjas, led by a man, Doug Logan, who was inexperienced in elections, had publicly stated he believed in the “Stop the Steal” movement and had stayed with the deranged election conspiracist Lin Wood while working to overturn the election. White, who was the Republican candidate for Pima County recorder in 2020, joined with Halvorsen and Moore, who were formerly leaders of the Clear Ballot Group, a Boston-based election technology company, to try to check the work of the Cyber Ninjas. They have found the Ninjas’ work wanting, from its faulty inception. “Normally in an audit, what you would do is take a known group of ballots, then check them against the official results,” White said. “The objective there is to find out if the official count is correct. But the Ninjas never attempted to do that.” Instead, they invented a system to conduct their own hand count, and it’s this that White and company think reveals the fatal flaws of the review Fann ordered. In October, they issued a report arguing that the hand count numbers appeared to be a hoax, invented to nearly match a machine count the Senate had ordered. The new report goes further, alleging that the Cyber Ninjas’ team miscounted original ballots that needed duplication to be correctly counted, and the duplicates made for that purpose. This problem alone led to 1,142 more ballots being counted than should have been, they say. But the problems, again, were in the conception of the audit, they report: “The point of an audit is to determine whether there are errors in the official results and discover the reasons for the errors. The objective of the Senate ‘forensic audit’ was to create a new result for the election; this is obvious since there was no attempt to directly compare even a minimal number of batches or boxes to the official result.” No wonder Fann never attempted to hire an experienced, unbiased auditor. That was never the point, as The Republic’s reporting shows. The point was to satisfy Trump and the election-fraud true believers, and to avoid the Steve Pierce Precedent. Tim Steller is a columnist for The Arizona Daily Star in Tucson. View more of the Sun's opinion section

Latest Wisconsin news, sports, business and entertainment at 1:20 am CST – wxow.com

By |2021-12-04T03:43:24-05:00December 4th, 2021|Election 2020|

VIRUS OUTBREAK-WISCONSIN WEDDING5 in California contract omicron linked to Wisconsin weddingOAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Public health officials say at least five people in Northern California have contracted the omicron variant of COVID-19, and the outbreak is linked to a wedding in Wisconsin last month. The outbreak was announced Friday — just two days after the first U.S. case of the omicron variant was identified in California. Much remains unknown about the new variant, including whether it is more contagious than previous strains, whether it makes people more seriously ill, and whether it can thwart the vaccine. The five people are among a group of 12 who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are linked to a Nov. 27 wedding in Wisconsin.ABORTION-WISCONSINWisconsin's Democratic governor vetoes GOP abortion billsMADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin’s Democratic Gov. Tony Evers has vetoed five Republican-authored anti-abortion bills, a move that came two days after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that could curtail if not end a woman’s right to abortion. Evers is making his support for abortion rights a key plank of his 2022 reelection campaign. He was widely expected to veto the measures the GOP-controlled Legislature passed in October. Republicans do not have enough votes in the Legislature to override the vetoes. Republican legislative leaders have not returned messages seeking comment on the vetoes and whether they would seek an override vote.ELECTION 2020-AUDITS-WISCONSINGroup asks judge to find Wisconsin GOP leader in contemptMADISON, Wis. (AP) — A liberal group has asked a judge to find Wisconsin Assembly Speaker Robin Vos in contempt of court for not following a November court order to turn over records about a secretive review of the 2020 election that Republicans have been conducting for months. American Oversight, which sued to get the records, filed the motion for contempt in Dane County circuit court on Friday. Judge Valerie Bailey-Rihn on Nov. 5 gave Vos until Nov. 19 to turn over the records that were created between May and late August. Vos has argued the group sued the wrong person.AP-US-CONDOS-EVACUATED-WISCONSINWisconsin condo building evacuated due to structural issuesWAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — A six-story condominium building that was the subject of structural complaints dating back to June 2020 has been evacuated in a Milwaukee suburb after engineers found the structure was in imminent danger of collapsing. Police and firefighters cleared the 48-unit Horizon West condominium building in Waukesha on Thursday night after an engineering report said its structural columns were compromised. A total of 65 people were evacuated. Waukesha Police Lt. Kevin Rice said the condo collapse in Surfside, Florida, that killed nearly 100 people in June was on his mind. City officials said 23 rooms were provided by the Salvation Army of Waukesha. Two properties near the building were also evacuated because they are in a possible collapse zone.CHRISTMAS PARADE-SUVDA: Overworked assistant set bail too low for parade suspectMADISON, Wis. (AP) — Milwaukee County's top prosecutor says a young assistant in his office sought $1,000 bail for a man later accused of driving through a Christmas parade because she was overworked and never saw his risk assessment. Darrell Brooks Jr. posted bail in a domestic violence case on Nov. 19. Two days later he allegedly drove his SUV through the parade in suburban Waukesha, killing six people. District Attorney John Chisholm told the county's judicial committee Thursday that there's no excuse for asking for such a low amount of bail. But he said the assistant was dealing with a heavy caseload and “made a mistake."ELECTION 2020-AUDITS-WISCONSINHead of GOP-led election probe says mayors could be jailedMADISON, Wis. (AP) — A retired state Supreme Court justice hired by Republicans to investigate Wisconsin’s 2020 election says the mayors of Madison and Green Bay should face punishment and possibly jail time if they don’t meet with him. Michael Gableman filed lawsuits Monday seeking to force Green Bay Mayor Eric Genrich and Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway to submit to depositions because they have “simply failed without reason or excuse to appear.” Gableman said he tried to arrange the meeting on Nov. 15. Although online court records do not list the lawsuits, copies of them were obtained by Wisconsin Public Radio and posted online on Thursday. Gableman’s petition asks for a subpoena that if ignored would constitute contempt of the legislature and be subject to punishment, including imprisonment.DOUBLE HOMICIDE-ARRESTMan suspected in Illinois homicides arrested in WisconsinKENOSHA, Wis. (AP) — Authorities have arrested a man in southeastern Wisconsin wanted in connection with a double homicide in Illinois. The Kenosha County Sheriff’s Department says the 36-year-old Algonquin, Illinois resident was taken into custody at a Salem Lakes, Wisconsin residence. is facing two felony counts of concealing a homicide death. A department spokesman says the suspect is in custody in the Kenosha County Jail awaiting extradition to Illinois. The Kenosha News reports he has not been formally booked. Police say the bodies of a male and female were discovered Wednesday in Algonquin, northwest of Chicago. Deputy Police Chief Ryan Markham says the incident hasn’t officially been termed a homicide, but it’s being investigated as such. The investigation is ongoing.VIRUS OUTBREAK-WISCONSINWisconsin COVID patients packing hospitals, no omicron yetMADISON, Wis. (AP) — Patients with COVID-19, most of them unvaccinated, are packing Wisconsin hospitals at levels not seen for a year, a worrying development even before the new omicron variant has been detected in the state. Amid concerns about the new and little-understood omicron variant, Wisconsin health officials on Thursday urged people to get vaccinated and take other steps to slow the spread. The latest date from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services shows people who are not vaccinated are nearly 11 times more likely to be hospitalized and 15 times more likely to die than those who are vaccinated.

Meadows doubles down on debunked election fraud claims and whitewashes January 6 riot …

By |2021-12-04T01:55:21-05:00December 4th, 2021|Election 2020|

By Zachary Cohen, Marshall Cohen and Gabby Orr, CNN In a new memoir, Donald Trump’s former chief of staff Mark Meadows doubles down on the baseless claim the 2020 election was stolen and whitewashed the violent attack on the US Capitol by Trump supporters on January 6, according to a copy of the book obtained by CNN. The book, titled “The Chief’s Chief,” spans nearly 300 pages and is set to be released next week. Meadows vigorously defends his former boss and peddles many of the debunked claims about alleged voter fraud and ballot irregularities that fueled the insurrection in the first place. Meadows absolves Trump of responsibility for the attack, giving just cursory details and echoing unfounded claims about the events of the day. Throughout the memoir, Meadows describes work-related conversations with Trump from his time at the White House, including private discussions about the election, efforts to find voter fraud and Trump’s speech at the Ellipse near the White House on January 6. Meadows previously told the House select committee investigating the attack that conversations like these are shielded by executive privilege — but these new disclosures in his new memoir could undermine his privilege claims, said House Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff. “He clearly is waiving any claim he has to keep confidential his communications with the former President or what happened in the White House,” Schiff, a California Democrat who is on the House select committee, told CNN’s Don Lemon on Thursday. “After all, if he can say it in a book, why he can’t he say it before Congress in an investigation?” Meadows is cooperating with the committee on some aspects of its subpoena, but privilege-related issues still aren’t settled. His attorney didn’t respond to questions Friday about whether Trump waived privilege for those portions of the book. The book touches on other key topics from the last year of Trump’s presidency, ranging from Trump’s battles with Pentagon leadership, the swift confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett, and the disputed timeline regarding Trump’s positive test for Covid-19 shortly before debating Joe Biden in fall 2020. Absolving Trump of January 6 The penultimate chapter of the book contains Meadows’ perspective surrounding January 6. “The idea to gather on January 6 was organic,” Meadows wrote, although he didn’t discuss the Trump campaign officials, donors, informal advisers and family members deeply involved in the planning. “(Trump) did not call for violence and he did not expect anyone would enter the Capitol Building,” Meadows claims, even though Trump explicitly encouraged his supporters to march to the Capitol and “fight like hell” against the lawmakers who refused to overturn Biden’s electoral victory. Meadows only revealed one conversation with Trump from January 6, saying that Trump ad-libbed when he said: “we’re going to walk down” to the Capitol, “and I’ll be there with you.” “When he got off stage, President Trump let me know that he had been speaking metaphorically about the walk to the Capitol,” Meadows wrote. “He knew as well as anyone that we couldn’t organize a trip like that on such short notice. It was clear the whole time that he didn’t actually intend to walk down Pennsylvania Avenue with the crowd.” The book correctly notes that only a fraction of rallygoers ended up inside the Capitol, and that some people were already wreaking havoc at the Capitol before Trump finished speaking. But Meadows’ narrative that the throngs of supporters didn’t take Trump’s comments seriously has been contradicted by many of the rioters themselves. According to court filings, many of the rioters later said in FBI interviews that they didn’t plan to go to the Capitol but were inspired by Trump’s speech, and that they expected he would be there too. He summed up the insurrection as “shameful” and “regrettable” but claimed the violence was orchestrated by “a small group of people” and “a handful of fanatics.” Officials have said roughly 2,000 people breached the Capitol that day, and more than 680 people have been charged with federal crimes. There were hundreds of assaults against police officers, leading to 140 injuries. From the very first pages of the memoir, Meadows embraces and promotes the falsehood that Trump won the election. At one point, Meadows falsely claims nearly every person that voted for Trump last year believes the election was rigged. Referencing the “forgotten men and women that Trump served so well,” Meadows said, “There are more than 70 million of these people, all of whom believe they were cheated out of another four years of President Trump.” A wide array of cybersecurity officials, federal judges and election officials from both parties, as well as post-election audits and recounts have confirmed that the 2020 election was not tainted. Trump lost the Electoral College vote and lagged behind Biden in the popular vote by more than 7 million ballots. Trump finished with roughly 74 million votes, compared to Biden’s 81 million. Meadows does describe private conversations with Trump where he and other officials attempted to explain to the former President how he lost the election. Members of the select committee have said Trump’s efforts to overturn the election are a key part of their investigation, and these disclosures could help the committee as it tries to pry loose details from Trump aides. In other sections of the book, Meadows outlines Team Trump’s conspiracy theories about the election results. He claimed it was their duty to investigate the claims because they firmly believe Trump won by a wide margin, based on rally attendance and twitter traffic. He recounts a conversation with Trump where they were attempting to explain how he lost the election. “I didn’t know what to say to him, standing there in front of the Resolute Desk with some of the campaign’s top advisors, when we he asked me what had put us so far behind in states that we were sure — as in dead certain — that we could win,” Meadows wrote. Trump’s Covid test Meadows details that others inside Trump’s inner circle besides himself were made aware that he had tested positive for Covid-19 three days before he attended the first presidential debate in Cleveland. Meadows writes that as soon as Trump’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, called to inform him that then-President Trump had received a positive result on September 26, he dialed White House social media director Dan Scavino, who was on the Marine One helicopter at the time. “To my shock, Dan answered the phone, and he could hear about every other word I was saying to him,” Meadows wrote in a copy of the book obtained by CNN. “What he heard probably went something like: ‘Dan… President… positive… Covid… keep… six feet… don’t let anyone near –.'” Meadows does not indicate whether Trump was tested again before hosting events at the White House over the days that followed, or before arriving to the debate hall in Cleveland later that week. “We’ll probably never know whether President Trump was positive that evening,” he writes. Trump said in a statement Wednesday, “The story of me having COVID prior to, or during, the first debate is Fake News. In fact, a test revealed that I did not have COVID prior to the debate.” Several senior aides to Trump soon tested positive for Covid-19, including Stephen Miller and Kayleigh McEnany. Meadows claims he was informed of his positive result. Others who were constantly around the president, including Hope Hicks also tested positive soon after. In his book, however, Meadows declined to even consider that Trump may have transmitted the virus to his aides. “Who, for instances, had infected Hope (Hicks), and where was that person now?” he writes. “Even in the debate prep sessions alone — where Hope, Chris Christie and Jared Kushner had all come within a few feet of him — would have been enough to infect him.” This story has been updated with additional details Friday. The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.

Group asks judge to fine Robin Vos for not releasing Gableman investigation records – Madison.com

By |2021-12-04T03:43:27-05:00December 3rd, 2021|Election 2020|

A liberal watchdog group is asking a Dane County judge to hold Assembly Speaker Robin Vos in contempt of court for failing to release records relating to the GOP-ordered probe into Wisconsin’s 2020 election.American Oversight’s motion, filed Friday, is the latest in a growing list of legal battles surrounding the investigation being carried out by former state Supreme Court Justice Michael Gableman, who this week asked for a court order compelling the mayors in Madison and Green Bay to comply with subpoenas he issued in October seeking in-person testimony.“At the same time that his hand-selected Special Counsel is trying to have local officials detained for failing to comply with his contradictory and ridiculous subpoenas, Speaker Vos is flagrantly defying an actual court order to release records to the public,” American Oversight executive director Austin Evers said in a statement. “This shell game demands accountability and needs to end.” A small percentage of voters and witnesses made mistakes on their absentee ballot certificates in 2020. Here are some examples of the kinds of errors that were either allowed or corrected by the clerk in order to permit the ballot to be counted. Judge Valerie Bailey-Rihn ruled Nov. 5 that Vos, R-Rochester, and Assembly Chief Clerk Ted Blazel had 10 days to release the requested public records, which span from the point that Gableman was hired in May through Aug. 27, when attorneys for Vos say Gableman officially became an authority over those records.While some records related to the investigation had been provided, American Oversight’s latest motion asks Bailey-Rihn to hold Vos in contempt of court for not releasing all the documents and fine him $2,000 a day until the request is fulfilled. The group mentions in the court filing that Vos and Blazel did not produce requested contractors’ records for Gableman and members of his team.Vos’ office had not responded to a request for comment Friday.Gableman on Monday asked the Waukesha County Circuit Court, which plans to take up the matter on Dec. 22, to compel Green Bay Mayor Eric Genrich and Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway to meet with him. An outside attorney for Genrich said Gableman’s maneuver isn’t legal to compel testimony and wasn’t filed in the correct court.Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul has dismissed Gableman’s probe as a “fake investigation” and has sought a restraining order barring Gableman from seeking interviews outside of a public legislative meeting. A hearing on Kaul’s lawsuit is scheduled for Dec. 23. Vos has allocated nearly $680,000 in taxpayer money for the one-party investigation, which is focused on some of the procedures voters and clerks relied on in casting and processing ballots. Gableman said on Wednesday his team has so far spent about $175,500 of those taxpayer dollars.Although some have raised the prospect of fraud, no claims of large-scale cheating have been substantiated, and the investigation, so far at least, is not seeking to review any ballots. Four voters out of roughly 3 million who cast ballots have been charged with fraud.Court decisions and a recount have affirmed President Joe Biden defeated Donald Trump to win Wisconsin by almost 21,000 votes.Several state Republicans have gone so far as to call on the Wisconsin Elections Commission’s nonpartisan administrator Meagan Wolfe to resign from her post, a call that Wolfe has described as “partisan politics at its worst.”Speaking during an online Marquette University Law School forum on Friday, Wolfe said one reason she does not plan to step down is that, should the bipartisan commission, which is split among three Democratic and three Republican appointees, not reach a consensus on a new administrator within 45 days, the decision would be made by the GOP-led state Senate.“It worries me that there’s opportunities to insert somebody that might have partisan motivations into this position in the future,” Wolfe said. “I will not be swayed by one side of the aisle sort of pushing me to do something that they’d prefer. I won’t be swayed by that. And so I think it’s really important to have somebody that’s truly nonpartisan in this role.” GALLERY: Local elections bring in voters West Baraboo resident Kathy Gray signs her name in the poll book as her husband, Frank, waits in line Tuesday morning at Village Hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo resident Ron Rupert signs in to vote Tuesday morning at village hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo resident Melinda Zufall feeds her ballot into a voting machine Tuesday morning at village hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo residents Ron Rupert and Melinda Zufall fill out their ballots Tuesday morning at village hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Mikka Roessler fills out a ballot Tuesday at the Baraboo Civic Center. BRIDGET COOKE/News Republic Baraboo voter Ryan Ramnarace signs an electronic poll book Tuesday at the Civic Center before collecting a ballot. BRIDGET COOKE/News Republic Bill Armstrong, Baraboo, inserts a completed ballot into the counter Tuesday at Baraboo Civic Center. BRIDGET COOKE/News Republic Election Chief Inspector Pam Jones processes absentee ballots Tuesday at Portage City Hall. JONATHAN RICHIE, Daily Register Election workers routinely wipe down and sanitize the ballot machine and the individual voting station throughout the day Tuesday during the spring primary election at Portage City Hall. JONATHAN RICHIE/Daily Register Portage City Clerk Marie Moe talks about absentee ballot processing to election workers Tuesday at City Hall. JONATHAN RICHIE/Daily Register Erica Helwig receives ballot instructions Oct. 21 at the Portage Municipal Building. Helwig, 21, cast her first vote in a presidential election through in-person early voting because she said it's a safer option than standing in line on Election Day during the COVID-19 pandemic. BRIDGET COOKE/Daily Register Erica Helwig fills out her ballot Oct. 21 at the Portage Municipal Building. Helwig, 21, decided to cast her first vote in a presidential election through in-person early voting because she said it's a safer option than standing in line on Election Day, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. BRIDGET COOKE/Daily Register Poll worker Matigan O'Leary sits outside Portage City Hall to screen voters for COVID-19 symptoms prior to entering the building to vote in the Aug. 11 primary election. Plexiglass partitions were placed between voters and poll workers and voters were given hand sanitizer upon entering the polling place. NICOLE AIMONE, Portage Daily Register Poll worker Sue Barton feeds an absentee ballot into a machine Aug. 11 at Portage City Hall during Wisconsin's partisan primary election. NICOLE AIMONE, Portage Daily Register Springvale Clerk Becky Gutzman signs in before dropping off town ballots April 13 at the Columbia County Administrative Building. BRIDGET COOKE, Portage Daily Register Patti Hauser-Kassner, of Lewiston, Randolph Clerk Maxine DeYoung, Lewiston Clerk Kurt Kassner and Hampden Clerk Diane Guenther wait with ballot bags while spaced apart April 13 in the lobby of the Columbia County Administrative Building. BRIDGET COOKE, Portage Daily Register Poll worker Matt Foster wipes down polling stations during the spring election April 7 in the basement of Portage city hall. NOAH VERNAU, Daily Register Becky Ness, deputy clerk for the city of Portage, explains the absentee ballot process to a voter days before the April election from behind a sheet of plastic at the Portage Municipal Building. Organizers also put curtains of plastic in front of poll workers during the election to prevent possible transmission of COVID-19. DAILY REGISTER ARCHIVES Baraboo City Clerk Brenda Zeman, left, and poll worker Ann Adkins count absentee ballots Tuesday afternoon at the civic center in Baraboo. SUSAN ENDRES, News Republic Gerald Cote signs a poll book Tuesday at the Baraboo Civic Center. BRIDGET COOKE, News Republic Election Day 2020 in West Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Election Day 2020 in Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Election Day 2020 in West Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo residents stand in land before preparing and casting their ballots in the Nov. 3 election.  SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Election Day 2020 in Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic 0 Comments #pu-email-form-politics-email-article { clear: both; background-color: #fff; color: #222; background-position: bottom; background-repeat: no-repeat; padding: 15px 20px; margin-bottom: 40px; border-top: 4px solid rgba(0,0,0,.8); border-bottom: 1px solid rgba(0,0,0,.2); display: none; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article, #pu-email-form-politics-email-article p { font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, "Segoe UI", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif, "Apple Color Emoji", "Segoe UI Emoji", "Segoe UI Symbol"; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article h1 { font-size: 24px; margin: 15px 0 5px 0; font-family: "serif-ds", Times, "Times New Roman", serif; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .lead { margin-bottom: 5px; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .email-desc { font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; margin-bottom: 5px; opacity: 0.7; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article form { padding: 10px 30px 5px 30px; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .disclaimer { opacity: 0.5; margin-bottom: 0; line-height: 100%; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .disclaimer a { color: #222; text-decoration: underline; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .email-hammer { border-bottom: 3px solid #222; opacity: .5; display: inline-block; padding: 0 10px 5px 10px; margin-bottom: -5px; font-size: 16px; } @media (max-width: 991px) { #pu-email-form-politics-email-article form { padding: 10px 0 5px 0; } } Stay up-to-date on the latest in local and national government and political topics with our newsletter.

Head of Wisconsin 2020 election inquiry takes mayors to court | News | denvergazette.com

By |2021-12-03T22:38:48-05:00December 3rd, 2021|Election 2020|

Former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Michael Gableman is requesting that a circuit court compel two Wisconsin mayors to comply with his investigation into the 2020 election.Gableman, who was hired in the summer by Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos in June to investigate "voting irregularities" on behalf of the chamber, filed suit in Waukesha County Circuit Court on Monday and said the mayors of two of the state's three largest cities failed to testify before him despite subpoenas he issued.WISCONSIN ELECTIONS COMMISSION HOLDS EMERGENCY MEETING AFTER SHERIFF CLAIMS LAW BROKEN IN 2020 "Of all the clerks and of all the mayors, those two simply failed without reason or excuse to appear for their depositions and answer questions about how and to what extent they allowed Mark Zuckerberg's employees to plan and administer their city's election in November 2020," he said, according to PBS Wisconsin.The two mayors he alleged failed to comply were Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway and Green Bay Mayor Eric Genrich.The two cities received money from the Center for Tech and Civic Life to help manage the elections amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The group received funding from Facebook.A representative for Rhodes-Conway told PBS Wisconsin the city did not receive a formal request and had a prior agreement with Gableman that no one from Madison would need to testify.The Washington Examiner reached out to the Green Bay mayor's office for comment.The court is set to hear arguments for the case on Dec. 22.Gableman, a Republican, served on the court from 2008 to 2018. Several days after the 2020 election, Gableman attended a Trump rally and appeared to cast doubt on the outcome of the election. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER"I don't think anyone here can think of anything more systematically unjust than a stolen election," he said, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.President Joe Biden defeated former President Donald Trump by about 20,600 votes in Wisconsin. Gov. Tony Evers certified the results in early December after a canvas and some county recounts.Democrats claim Republicans are on a misguided fishing expedition with their investigations."The fact will remain that the 2020 election was free, fair, and conclusive," Wisconsin Democratic Party executive director Nellie Sires said in July. "It's time for the speaker to end the charade and start telling the truth."Wisconsin election officials have found a couple dozen instances of voter fraud amid 3.3 million ballots cast, a total roughly in line with previous election cycles, leading to some charges. But a separate review by the nonpartisan Legislative Audit Bureau found no widespread fraud — though it did recommend changes to state law and policies, according to a report released in October.Original Location: Head of Wisconsin 2020 election inquiry takes mayors to courtWashington Examiner Videos[embedded content]

Fulton election workers file defamation suit over continued push of debunked conspiracy theory

By |2021-12-04T01:55:24-05:00December 3rd, 2021|Election 2020|

Two Fulton County elections workers are suing a popular far-right website that repeatedly spread false accusations that the workers committed mass voter fraud, arguing The Gateway Pundit’s claims led to racist threats and real-world harassment. The defamation suit, filed in Missouri where the site’s publishers Jim and Joe Hoft reside, says that The Gateway Pundit wrote a series of articles falsely accusing Ruby Freeman and her daughter, Wandrea “Shaye” Moss of altering election results after former President Donald Trump narrowly lost the state in the 2020 election. Other suits are pending against fellow pro-Trump outlets Newsmax and One America News as well as Fox News for claims made about voting machine vendors and their employees.  Debunked and disproven claims that the duo used “suitcases” of hidden ballots, counted batches of votes multiple times and illegally conducted vote counting in secret at State Farm Arena have served as a cornerstone of Trump supporters’ baseless claim that Georgia’s election was fraudulent and must be overturned and, in particular, that Fulton County’s elections board must be replaced by the state. Want to see more in-depth journalism for Savannah and Coastal Georgia? Have The Current delivered to your inbox each Wednesday and Sunday. “With no concern for the truth or the consequences of their willful conduct, Defendants baselessly portrayed Plaintiffs as traitors who participated in a carefully planned conspiracy to steal the presidential election in Georgia,” the lawsuit reads. “Within 24 hours, the claims had been publicly and definitively refuted by Georgia elections officials through a detailed explanation of what the misinterpreted video actually showed: no suitcases; no illegal ballots; no voter fraud.” On Dec. 3, 2020, Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani regaled Georgia lawmakers with a false and fanciful tale that Freeman and Moss were akin to drug dealers “passing out dope” and that a selectively edited surveillance video was evidence of fraud.  Elections officials and investigators said that was not the case. “What the video shows is that they have pulled out plastic bins from underneath the desks,” Fulton elections director Rick Barron said the day after the hearing. “It was normal processing that occurred there, as Gabe Sterling from the state explained this morning.” Fact-checking website Lead Stories posted an explainer of what the video actually showed, and included statements from officials with the secretary of state’s office calling Giuliani’s claims false. MORE: Fact-checking Rudy Giuliani’s grandiose claims of election fraud But other Republicans quickly jumped on the claims as evidence of fraudulent election practices, including Rep. Jody Hice, the Trump-endorsed candidate for secretary of state, who tweeted a video clip from the hearing that showed Freeman and Moss working and called it “F R A U D.” Trump himself mentioned Freeman’s name more than a dozen times in a secretly recorded phone call where he pressured Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to “find” enough votes to overturn his defeat. More than two dozen articles on The Gateway Pundit’s website appear when searching Freeman’s name, with headlines like “BREAKING: CROOKED GEORGIA ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR Filmed Pulling Out Suitcases of Ballots from Beneath Table IS IDENTIFIED” that specifically targets the two women and attacks media coverage that explains why their posts are false. The lawsuit says after elections officials knocked down the claims made by The Gateway Pundit and other pro-Trump media outlets, Jim and Joe Hoft continued to write false stories about the two election workers while knowing that they were not true.  The suit also details harassment the two Black women faced after The Gateway Pundit stories received traction, including at least 400 emails, 75 text messages and countless phone calls. Strangers showed up to their homes, including two occasions where people tried to force their way inside to make a “citizen’s arrest.” Callers left racist messages and threats of violence, and as recently as last month Freeman says she received an email accusing her of treason with a link to The Gateway Pundit. Elections officials and workers around the country have faced an onslaught of violence and harassment after the 2020 election, with many opting to retire or quit before the midterms. This story comes to The Current through a reporting partnership with GPB News, a non-profit newsroom covering the state of Georgia. Get past the headlines: Sign up for our newsletter focused on Coastal Georgia. Have The Current delivered Wednesday and Sunday to your inbox. Sign up now. SUBSCRIBE NOW By clicking subscribe you agree to share your email address with The Current and Mailchimp to receive marketing, updates, and other emails from the site owner. Use the unsubscribe link in those emails to opt out at any time. Success! You're on the list. Whoops! There was an error and we couldn't process your subscription. Please reload the page and try again. Processing… Related

Group asks judge to fine Vos for not releasing Gableman investigation records – Madison.com

By |2021-12-03T21:24:52-05:00December 3rd, 2021|Election 2020|

A liberal watchdog group is asking a Dane County judge to hold Assembly Speaker Robin Vos in contempt of court for failing to release records relating to the GOP-ordered probe into Wisconsin's 2020 election.American Oversight's motion, filed Friday, is the latest in a growing list of legal battles surrounding the investigation being carried out by former state Supreme Court Justice Michael Gableman, who this week asked for a court order compelling the mayors in Madison and Green Bay to comply with subpoenas he issued in October seeking in-person testimony.“At the same time that his hand-selected Special Counsel is trying to have local officials detained for failing to comply with his contradictory and ridiculous subpoenas, Speaker Vos is flagrantly defying an actual court order to release records to the public,” American Oversight executive director Austin Evers said in a statement. “This shell game demands accountability and needs to end." A small percentage of voters and witnesses made mistakes on their absentee ballot certificates in 2020. Here are some examples of the kinds of errors that were either allowed or corrected by the clerk in order to permit the ballot to be counted. Judge Valerie Bailey-Rihn ruled Nov. 5 that Vos, R-Rochester, and Assembly Chief Clerk Ted Blazel had 10 days to release the requested public records, which span from the point that Gableman was hired in May through Aug. 27, when attorneys for Vos say Gableman officially became an authority over those records.While some records related to the investigation had been provided, American Oversight's latest motion asks Bailey-Rihn to hold Vos in contempt of court for not releasing all the documents and fine him $2,000 a day until the request is fulfilled. The group mentions in the court filing that Vos and Blazel did not produce requested contractors' records for Gableman and members of his team.Vos' office had not responded to a request for comment Friday.Gableman on Monday asked the Waukesha County Circuit Court, which plans to take up the matter on Dec. 22, to compel Green Bay Mayor Eric Genrich and Madison Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway to meet with him. An outside attorney for Genrich said Gableman's maneuver isn't legal to compel testimony and wasn't filed in the correct court.Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul has dismissed Gableman's probe as a "fake investigation" and has sought a restraining order barring Gableman from seeking interviews outside of a public legislative meeting. A hearing on Kaul's lawsuit is scheduled for Dec. 23. Vos has allocated nearly $680,000 in taxpayer money for the one-party investigation, which is focused on some of the procedures voters and clerks relied on in casting and processing ballots. Gableman said on Wednesday his team has so far spent about $175,500 of those taxpayer dollars.Although some have raised the prospect of fraud, no claims of large-scale cheating have been substantiated, and the investigation, so far at least, is not seeking to review any ballots. Four voters out of roughly 3 million who cast ballots have been charged with fraud. Court decisions and a recount have affirmed President Joe Biden defeated Donald Trump to win Wisconsin by almost 21,000 votes.Several state Republicans have gone so far as to call on the Wisconsin Elections Commission's nonpartisan administrator Meagan Wolfe to resign from her post, a call that Wolfe has described as "partisan politics at its worst."Speaking during an online Marquette University Law School forum on Friday, Wolfe said one reason she does not plan to step down is that, should the bipartisan commission, which is split among three Democratic and three Republican appointees, not reach a consensus on a new administrator within 45 days, the decision would be made by the GOP-led state Senate."It worries me that there's opportunities to insert somebody that might have partisan motivations into this position in the future," Wolfe said. "I will not be swayed by one side of the aisle sort of pushing me to do something that they'd prefer. I won't be swayed by that. And so I think it's really important to have somebody that’s truly nonpartisan in this role." GALLERY: Local elections bring in voters West Baraboo resident Kathy Gray signs her name in the poll book as her husband, Frank, waits in line Tuesday morning at Village Hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo resident Ron Rupert signs in to vote Tuesday morning at village hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo resident Melinda Zufall feeds her ballot into a voting machine Tuesday morning at village hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo residents Ron Rupert and Melinda Zufall fill out their ballots Tuesday morning at village hall. SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Mikka Roessler fills out a ballot Tuesday at the Baraboo Civic Center. BRIDGET COOKE/News Republic Baraboo voter Ryan Ramnarace signs an electronic poll book Tuesday at the Civic Center before collecting a ballot. BRIDGET COOKE/News Republic Bill Armstrong, Baraboo, inserts a completed ballot into the counter Tuesday at Baraboo Civic Center. BRIDGET COOKE/News Republic Election Chief Inspector Pam Jones processes absentee ballots Tuesday at Portage City Hall. JONATHAN RICHIE, Daily Register Election workers routinely wipe down and sanitize the ballot machine and the individual voting station throughout the day Tuesday during the spring primary election at Portage City Hall. JONATHAN RICHIE/Daily Register Portage City Clerk Marie Moe talks about absentee ballot processing to election workers Tuesday at City Hall. JONATHAN RICHIE/Daily Register Erica Helwig receives ballot instructions Oct. 21 at the Portage Municipal Building. Helwig, 21, cast her first vote in a presidential election through in-person early voting because she said it's a safer option than standing in line on Election Day during the COVID-19 pandemic. BRIDGET COOKE/Daily Register Erica Helwig fills out her ballot Oct. 21 at the Portage Municipal Building. Helwig, 21, decided to cast her first vote in a presidential election through in-person early voting because she said it's a safer option than standing in line on Election Day, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. BRIDGET COOKE/Daily Register Poll worker Matigan O'Leary sits outside Portage City Hall to screen voters for COVID-19 symptoms prior to entering the building to vote in the Aug. 11 primary election. Plexiglass partitions were placed between voters and poll workers and voters were given hand sanitizer upon entering the polling place. NICOLE AIMONE, Portage Daily Register Poll worker Sue Barton feeds an absentee ballot into a machine Aug. 11 at Portage City Hall during Wisconsin's partisan primary election. NICOLE AIMONE, Portage Daily Register Springvale Clerk Becky Gutzman signs in before dropping off town ballots April 13 at the Columbia County Administrative Building. BRIDGET COOKE, Portage Daily Register Patti Hauser-Kassner, of Lewiston, Randolph Clerk Maxine DeYoung, Lewiston Clerk Kurt Kassner and Hampden Clerk Diane Guenther wait with ballot bags while spaced apart April 13 in the lobby of the Columbia County Administrative Building. BRIDGET COOKE, Portage Daily Register Poll worker Matt Foster wipes down polling stations during the spring election April 7 in the basement of Portage city hall. NOAH VERNAU, Daily Register Becky Ness, deputy clerk for the city of Portage, explains the absentee ballot process to a voter days before the April election from behind a sheet of plastic at the Portage Municipal Building. Organizers also put curtains of plastic in front of poll workers during the election to prevent possible transmission of COVID-19. DAILY REGISTER ARCHIVES Baraboo City Clerk Brenda Zeman, left, and poll worker Ann Adkins count absentee ballots Tuesday afternoon at the civic center in Baraboo. SUSAN ENDRES, News Republic Gerald Cote signs a poll book Tuesday at the Baraboo Civic Center. BRIDGET COOKE, News Republic Election Day 2020 in West Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Election Day 2020 in Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Election Day 2020 in West Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic West Baraboo residents stand in land before preparing and casting their ballots in the Nov. 3 election.  SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic Election Day 2020 in Baraboo SUSAN ENDRES/News Republic 0 Comments #pu-email-form-politics-email-article { clear: both; background-color: #fff; color: #222; background-position: bottom; background-repeat: no-repeat; padding: 15px 20px; margin-bottom: 40px; border-top: 4px solid rgba(0,0,0,.8); border-bottom: 1px solid rgba(0,0,0,.2); display: none; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article, #pu-email-form-politics-email-article p { font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, "Segoe UI", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif, "Apple Color Emoji", "Segoe UI Emoji", "Segoe UI Symbol"; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article h1 { font-size: 24px; margin: 15px 0 5px 0; font-family: "serif-ds", Times, "Times New Roman", serif; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .lead { margin-bottom: 5px; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .email-desc { font-size: 16px; line-height: 20px; margin-bottom: 5px; opacity: 0.7; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article form { padding: 10px 30px 5px 30px; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .disclaimer { opacity: 0.5; margin-bottom: 0; line-height: 100%; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .disclaimer a { color: #222; text-decoration: underline; } #pu-email-form-politics-email-article .email-hammer { border-bottom: 3px solid #222; opacity: .5; display: inline-block; padding: 0 10px 5px 10px; margin-bottom: -5px; font-size: 16px; } @media (max-width: 991px) { #pu-email-form-politics-email-article form { padding: 10px 0 5px 0; } } Stay up-to-date on the latest in local and national government and political topics with our newsletter.

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