Ex-Louisville officer gets probation for using excessive force during Breonna Taylor protest

By |2023-02-07T07:25:20-05:00February 6th, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Related News and Opinion February 6, 2023 February 6, 2023 February 6, 2023 February 3, 2023 February 2, 2023 IL file photo A former Louisville, Kentucky, police officer who pleaded guilty last fall to a misdemeanor charge of using excessive force in 2020 has been sentenced to two years of probation, 200 hours of community service and a $5,000 fine. Katie R. Crews, 29, of Jeffersonville, Indiana, was sentenced last week in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky. Crews’ sentence was less than the maximum penalty she could have received, but more than her attorneys and prosecutors had asked for. The maximum penalty associated with the charge is one year in prison and a $100,000 fine, but attorneys for both sides had asked the judge for one year of probation. U.S. District Court Judge Benjamin Beaton said he “reluctantly” agreed to a sentence that did not include prison time for Crews, calling the case “extremely difficult,” according to a report from Louisville news station WDRB. Crews had been indicted in March 2022 on a felony charge of using excessive force — a charge that carried a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. She ended up pleading guilty to a misdemeanor. According to her October 2022 plea agreement, Crews had been working as a Louisville Metro Police Department officer on June 1, 2020, when she, along with other Louisville officers and National Guard members, were sent to break up a crowd at a gas station. Crews then approached a nearby barbecue restaurant and began firing nonlethal pepper balls, the agreement says. Crews intentionally fired a pepper ball at someone who was standing in the doorway of the restaurant, hitting that person in the shoulder, the agreement says. That person, identified in the plea agreement as M.M., was not behaving aggressively and did not pose a threat to Crews or to others, the agreement says. Per Louisville Metro Police policy, officers should only shoot pepper balls at a person if that person is actively aggressive, the agreement says. According to an Associated Press report on Crews’ October 2022 plea hearing, after M.M. was shot with the pepper ball, her uncle David McAtee — the barbecue restaurant’s owner — took out a gun and fired out the restaurant’s door. Crews, who is white, and other officers then switched to live ammunition and McAtee, who was Black, was fatally shot in the chest by a National Guard officer. The episode happened on a night when protesters were gathering in Louisville’s streets to protest the death of Breonna Taylor, a Black EMT who was killed by police executing a drug search warrant at her home. As part of her plea agreement, Crews no longer works as a Louisville Metro Police officer and has forfeited her Kentucky law enforcement certification. Crews also agreed not to work in any law enforcement job, including as a civilian or military police officer, sheriff’s deputy, jailer or correctional officer. “This former Louisville police officer abused her authority as a law enforcement officer and violated the victim’s civil rights,” Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke said in a news release issued Jan. 30. “This sentence makes clear that law enforcement officials are not above the law.” Clarke works for the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. Louisville officers and two National Guard officers were later cleared in a criminal probe into McAtee’s death. That probe found that the officers were justified in their use of deadly force because McAtee had fired at them first, the Associated Press story said. Please enable JavaScript to view this content.

Across America | | phillytrib.com – The Philadelphia Tribune

By |2023-02-04T23:01:50-05:00February 4th, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Ex-officer involved in 2020 protest shooting avoids prisonLOUISVILLE, Ky. — A former Louisville police officer blamed for instigating a deadly shooting during the 2020 protests over the death of Breonna Taylor was sentenced Monday to two years of probation.Katie R. Crews, 30, pleaded guilty last year to one count of using excessive force during a curfew crackdown in 2020 that ended with the fatal shooting of restaurant owner David McAtee. U.S. District Judge Benjamin Beaton called Crews' actions "incredibly dangerous" and doubled a one-year recommended probation period to two years.Beaton said he was reluctant to allow Crews to avoid prison time, but was told that McAtee's family had given their blessing to the recommended sentence."None of us should minimize this," Beaton said during the hourlong hearing Jan. 30. Crews was also ordered to perform 200 hours of community service, and she can no longer work in law enforcement.Also Monday, lawyers for McAtee's family announced the settlement of a wrongful death lawsuit. The suit filed against Louisville Police, two National Guard members and Crews was settled for $725,000, said attorney Steve Romines.The Associated PressSt. Louis to pay $5.2 million after 2017 mass arrestsST. LOUIS — The city of St. Louis will pay nearly $5.2 million to settle claims by people who were arrested during a protest in 2017 over the acquittal of a police officer in the shooting death of a Black man, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.According to a proposed class action settlement filed last week, the city agreed to pay $4.91 million, or about $58,500 per person, to 84 people who were protesting in downtown St. Louis.The lawsuit claimed the protesters' rights were violated when they were caught in a police "kettle" as officers surrounded and arrested everyone in the area. Three people who filed individual lawsuits settled from $85,000 each.They were protesting after former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley was acquitted in the Dec. 20, 2011, shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith.Protesters said police surrounded more than 120 people who officers said did not follow dispersal orders. Several people claimed police used excessive force and indiscriminate pepper spray, including against bystanders who were not protesting.The city denied any wrongdoing as part of last week's settlement. A city spokesman declined comment.The Associated PressWhite supremacists who attacked Black DJ sentencedSEATTLE — Four white men with white supremacist ties were sentenced in federal court in Seattle for a 2018 assault on a Black DJ at a bar in the suburb of Lynnwood. Judge Richard Jones sentenced the men to varying prison terms, the Daily Herald reported in late January.Jason DeSimas, of Tacoma, will serve four years. Under a plea agreement, prosecutors and the defense recommended just over three years. Jason Stanley, of Boise, Idaho, had the same plea deal. Jones sentenced him to four years, as well.Randy Smith, of Eugene, Oregon, got 3½ years in prison. And Daniel Dorson, of Corvallis Oregon, got 2⅓ years.All four were previously convicted of committing a hate crime and making false statements. The man they attacked, Tyrone Smith, said outside the courthouse that his life is forever changed.The judge also ordered the defendants to pay nearly $171,000 in restitution to cover lost wages and medical bills. He called the attack that of a "modern day unhooded KKK."Smith said the defendants' actions changed him from an outgoing person who DJ'ed for his friends for fun, to someone who struggles with anxiety and uses a cane.On Dec. 7, 2018, DeSimas and others traveled to Lynnwood on the way to visiting the site of a Whidbey Island cabin where Robert Jay Mathews, the neo-Nazi leader of the violent hate group The Order, died in a gunfight with federal agents on Dec. 8, 1984. It has become a far-right holiday, known as Martyr's Day."As we can all see, it's been a long road for me," Smith said. "But I had enough courage to come down and make sure this process was handled and justice was actually served."On Dec. 7, 2018, DeSimas and others traveled to Lynnwood on the way to visiting the site of a Whidbey Island cabin where Robert Jay Mathews, the neo-Nazi leader of the violent hate group The Order, died in a gunfight with federal agents on Dec. 8, 1984. It has become a far-right holiday, known as Martyr's Day.That night, DeSimas attended a gathering with other white supremacist sympathizers, prosecutors said. Shortly after midnight, about a dozen of them went to the Rec Room Bar and Grill. Some wore jackets with patches indicating their white supremacist beliefs and some had similar tattoos, including some depicting swastikas, prosecutors said.At some point, Stanley messed with Smith's DJ equipment. Smith pushed him away. In response, DeSimas and others surrounded Smith, using racist slurs while kicking, punching and stomping on Smith, prosecutors said. Witnesses who tried to intervene were also attacked.The men then left the bar and went to Whidbey Island, where they attended the Martyr's Day event.Federal prosecutors indicted the men in December 2020. Citing insufficient evidence, Snohomish County prosecutors declined to charge six other men who were at the tavern the night of the attack.DeSimas wrote in a letter to the judge that he was "ashamed" of his actions, saying he no longer shared the views he previously held.Dorson wrote in a similar letter that he was "disgusted by the fear I took part in creating."Nick Brown, the U.S. Attorney for Western Washington, said seeking consequences for the attack was a high priority for the Justice Department and the FBI.Rick Collodi, the FBI's special agent in charge of Seattle's field office, said the defendants tried to conceal their actions, but the truth came out."The four defendants admitted to being members of a white supremacist group," Collodi said. "While they have the right to believe what they want, they do not have the right to commit a crime."

Former Louisville officer gets probation for using excessive force on night David McAtee was killed

By |2023-02-01T02:27:36-05:00February 1st, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

LOUISVILLE, KY., (WDRB) -- A federal judge "reluctantly" agreed Monday on a sentence of no prison time for a former Louisville Metro Police officer convicted of using excessive force during the Breonna Taylor protests.But U.S. District Court Judge Benjamin Beaton issued a stiffer sentence than what prosecutors had recommended for Katie Crews, calling her actions "extremely dangerous." Crews, who pleaded guilty to using excessive force the night David McAtee was killed in 2020, was sentenced Monday to two years of probation, 200 hours of community service and a $5,000 fine.Crews was initially charged with a felony and was facing up to 10 years in prison for shooting pepper balls at McAtee's niece, Machelle McAtee, on June 1, 2020, striking her once in the shoulder, as the woman was standing on private property and not a threat to officers.Prosecutors agreed to reduce the charge to a misdemeanor, carrying a maximum sentence of one year behind bars. Both sides recommended a sentence of one year of probation. U.S. District Court Judge Benjamin Beaton said "it was an extremely difficult case" and "the level of danger was extreme," but "the best of our bad options is to reluctantly approve" the probation deal.Beaton, however, doubled the amount of time on probation and community service and added the fine.Crews did not speak during her sentencing. Attorneys for McAtee’s family have said, "Ms. Crews accepted responsibility for her role in this and the family feels that sending her to prison would only make it worse when it is the LMPD as a whole that inadequately trained her and sent her there that night that deserves the lion's share of blame."The incident and subsequent death of McAtee, killed by a Kentucky National Guard soldier, occurred after Louisville police and guard members arrived at Dino’s Food Mart at 26th Street and Broadway in the Russell neighborhood to disperse a crowd in violation of the then-citywide curfew in response to protests over the death of Breonna Taylor.Crews told investigators she shot at Machelle McAtee because she "didn't comply" with orders. Machelle McAtee was standing in the doorway of a private business.Video shows that as Machelle McAtee is pulled inside by David McAtee, he leans out the door and fires a bullet. When he reaches out and fires again seconds later, Crews, LMPD Officer Allen Austin and two members of the National Guard returned fire, 18 shots in total.An unidentified guardsman fired the only bullet that struck and killed McAtee, 53. He was shot once in the chest.Federal prosecutors argued, in part, Crews was fairly new on the force and “clearly could not have foreseen the tragic outcome of her actions in this case,” according to a sentencing memorandum. Said defense attorney Steve Schroering, in court records: "The force was excessive and inconsistent with training. But Crews’ actions carried no evil or malicious intent. Her intent was to enforce the mayor’s curfew as she understood it ....  In her short time as an officer neither Crews nor her supervisors had been asked or expected to enforce a curfew. She had never been issued or handled a pepperball launcher while on duty. The actual hands-on training with the tool was minimal."And while a pepper ball gun is considered a dangerous weapon under sentencing guidelines, prosecutors wrote that many officers perceive them as “minimal force” and similar to paintball guns.“In using a weapon that most LMPD officers equate with a 'paintball gun,' Defendant Crews likely did not foresee the likelihood of injury," prosecutors with the U.S. Attorney's office wrote in the sentencing recommendation.Under terms of the sentence, Crews is not allowed to seek a job in law enforcement again.Crews was also likely acting on high emotions from previous days of city-wide protests revolving around the Breonna Taylor slaying on March 13, 2020, according to the prosecution.While working downtown on May 28, Crews was “accosted by a female protestor,” according to the filing. A picture of this encounter was published in The Courier-Journal, and Crews, prosecutors said, posted a comment on Facebook that “expresses delight at the prospect of a pepperball gun being used to cause pain to this particular prosecutor.”The picture appears to show a female protester handing Crews a flower, but Crews wrote that the woman "was saying and doing a lot more than 'offering flowers' to me."P.S. I hope the pepper balls that she got lit up with a little hurt," she wrote on Facebook. "Come back and get you some tonight ole girl, I'll be on the line again tonight."The prosecution argued that Crews’ actions “were likely motivated, at least in part, by these emotions. However, (the prosecution) did not identify any uses of excessive force by Defendant Crews predating the incident.”And since the incident, Crews has maintained employment and is a contributing member to society, according to the sentencing recommendation. She works as a K-9 handler, though not with law enforcement, according to the sentencing filing.“Given the circumstances, a sentence of probation is sufficient to protect the public from further crimes of the defendant," the U.S. Attorney's office concluded.Copyright 2023 Media. All Rights Reserved.

Ex-Louisville officer involved in fatal David McAtee raid gets probation – WKU Public Radio

By |2023-01-31T22:22:58-05:00January 31st, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Former Louisville Metro Police Department officer Katie Crews was sentenced to two years of probation Monday for her actions leading up to the death of local restaurant owner David “YaYa” McAtee in June 2020.Crews pleaded guilty last year to misdemeanor excessive use of force after prosecutors alleged she used a pepper ball gun against McAtee’s niece, Machelle McAtee, who was on private property and posed no threat. In exchange for avoiding jail time, Crews also agreed to give up her law enforcement certification and to never pursue a job in policing again.At the hearing inside Louisville’s downtown federal courthouse, District Court Judge Benjamin Beaton struggled with whether to accept the proposed plea agreement, calling the case “incredibly difficult.”“We’ve had a lot of cases from 2020 come through this courtroom and we’ve remarked how fortunate things went for the city and residents. It could have been much worse. Things did go quite badly in this instance,” Beaton said, referring to McAtee’s death and its impact on his friends and family.Early on June 1, 2020, Crews and several other officers and National Guard members arrived at 26th and Broadway to break up a social gathering. It was the first weekend of protests responding to the police killing of Breonna Taylor and a city-wide curfew was in place.The party in the parking lot of YaYa’s BBQ that law enforcement interrupted was peaceful and blocks away from any protests. Crews fired pepper balls at Machelle anyway, in an attempt to break up the crowd.When Machelle ran into her uncle’s restaurant, David McAtee stepped out of the front door and fired two shots. LMPD officers and Kentucky National Guard members returned fire. A state investigation concluded that the fatal bullet was shot by a guard member.McAtee was a well-liked food vendor in Louisville’s Russell neighborhood and was known for giving away free food, including to police officers.Beaton asked federal prosecutors and Crews’ defense attorney, Steve Schroering, to make their “best arguments” for why Crews should avoid jail time. The sentencing report from the U.S. Probation Office recommended Crews serve one year in jail, the maximum sentence for the misdemeanor charge.Prosecutors and Schroering argued Crews had not been the subject of any disciplinary action during the two years she was a patrol officer for LMPD or during her time with the Kentucky National Guard between 2011 and 2022. Crews was fired from LMPD last February.Schoering said body camera footage collected from the night of McAtee’s death showed she was “courteous and professional.”“In all of that body camera footage, there’s not one instance in which Katie acts in a malicious way,” he said.Schoering added that LMPD officers were asked to work exhaustingly long shifts during the 2020 racial justice protests, which he called “unexpected and unprecedented.”Beaton returned, however, to a Facebook post and text messages collected from Crews’ phone.Prior to the raid at YaYa’s BBQ, Crews mocked a protester in a Facebook post, writing, "I hope the pepper balls that she got lit up with a little later on hurt. Come back and get ya some more ole girl, I’ll be on the line again tonight.”Beaton and prosecutors read text messages aloud during the hearing, which Beaton said provided insight into Crews’ state of mind while working the protests.In an exchange with her wife regarding a protest outside of the Louisville jail, Crews wrote: “Lighting them up with pepper balls lol.” In another text message, Crews said officers were “chomping at the bit, just waiting to get our hands on people.”Ultimately, Beaton decided to approve the plea agreement, but he doubled the length of Crews’ probation and community service hours. Along with two years of probation, Crews is required to serve 200 hours of community service and pay a fine of $5,000.Steve Romines, one of the attorneys representing the McAtee family, provided a statement Monday agreeing with the sentence.“Crews accepted responsibility for her role in this and the family feels that sending her to prison would only make it worse when it is the LMPD as a whole that inadequately trained her and sent her there that night that deserves the lion’s share of the blame,” he said.Romines also said a wrongful death lawsuit brought by McAtee’s mother against Louisville Metro and the Kentucky National Guard was settled for $750,000. A jury trial in the civil case had been scheduled to start in April.

Ex-officer involved in 2020 protest shooting avoids prison – Connecticut Post

By |2023-01-30T20:42:15-05:00January 30th, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A former Louisville police officer blamed for instigating a deadly shooting during the 2020 protests over the death of Breonna Taylor was sentenced Monday to two years of probation.Katie R. Crews, 30, pleaded guilty last year to one count of using excessive force during a curfew crackdown in 2020 that ended with the fatal shooting of restaurant owner David McAtee. In court Monday, U.S. District Judge Benjamin Beaton called Crews' actions “incredibly dangerous” and doubled a one-year recommended probation period to two years. Crews was also ordered to perform 200 hours of community service, and she can no longer work in law enforcement.

Ex-officer involved in 2020 protest shooting avoids prison – WRAL

By |2023-01-30T20:42:17-05:00January 30th, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

LOUISVILLE, KY. — A former Louisville police officer blamed for instigating a deadly shooting during the 2020 protests over the death of Breonna Taylor was sentenced Monday to two years of probation.Katie R. Crews, 30, pleaded guilty last year to one count of using excessive force during a curfew crackdown in 2020 that ended with the fatal shooting of restaurant owner David McAtee.In court Monday, U.S. District Judge Benjamin Beaton called Crews' actions “incredibly dangerous” and doubled a one-year recommended probation period to two years. Crews was also ordered to perform 200 hours of community service, and she can no longer work in law enforcement.Beaton said he was reluctant to allow Crews to avoid prison time, but was told that McAtee's family had given their blessing to the recommended sentence.“None of us should minimize this,” Beaton said during the hourlong hearing.McAtee’s death further angered protesters who had began massing in Louisville’s downtown streets in May 2020 over the death of Taylor, a Black medical tech killed by police who entered her apartment using a falsified drug warrant.Crews fired pepper balls at a crowd near McAtee's restaurant and into his kitchen, where his niece was struck in the shoulder. McAtee returned fire with a handgun, and was fatally shot by a National Guard member who had been deployed to Louisville to help enforce curfews.Former Louisville Metro Police Chief Erika Shields said the firing of the pepper balls by Crews “really jump-started the chaos that ensued.”Crews was fired last year for for escalating the conflict the night of McAtee’s death and for a separate incident in which she taunted a protester on social media a couple of days earlier.The former officer had been photographed by media with a protester who appeared to offer her a flower. Crews posted the photo on social media and wrote that she hoped “the pepper balls that (the protester) got lit up with a little later on hurt.”“Come back and get ya some more ole girl, I’ll be on the line again tonight,” Crews wrote.Crews' attorney, Steve Schroering, said in court Monday that the woman in the photo was cursing and berating the officers that night, including Crews, according to reviews of body camera footage. Schroering said the officers were under extreme pressure during the protests and that Crews' social media post was “a reaction to something that was put out to the public that was not true.”On the night of McAtee’s death, Crews was part of a group of Louisville officers and National Guard members sent to an area near his eatery, YaYa’s BBQ, to break up a crowd.Crews approached the kitchen of the restaurant while firing nonlethal pepper balls, which release a chemical agent. The shots from Crews prompted bystanders to rush into McAtee’s kitchen, and Crews kept firing in that direction. McAtee’s niece, standing in the doorway of the kitchen, was hit in the shoulder by one of Crews’ nonlethal rounds.After his niece was hit, McAtee pulled a pistol from his hip and fired a shot out the door. Crews and other officers then switched to live rounds and McAtee, leaning out his kitchen door, was fatally shot in the chest. Family members said in a lawsuit against Crews that McAtee didn't know that nonlethal rounds were being fired into the restaurant.Prosecutors later cleared Louisville officers and two National Guard members in a criminal probe into McAtee’s death, saying they were justified in using deadly force because McAtee fired at them.

Former Louisville officer sentenced for excessive force – Spectrum News

By |2023-01-30T20:42:19-05:00January 30th, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Former Louisville police officer Katie Crews was sentenced Monday for violating an individual’s rights by using excessive force, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.  What You Need To Know Crews pleaded guilty to firing a pepper ball at the niece of a local restaurant owner She's been sentenced to two years of probation, 200 hours of community service and a $5,000 fine She had initially been charged with a felony and faced up to 10 years in prison On June 1, 2020, Crews — who was employed with the Louisville Metro Police Department at the time — responded to the area of YaYa’s BBQ at 26th and Broadway along with other officers and the National Guard to break up a gathering that was violating a city-mandated curfew in wake of Breonna Taylor protests. Court documents said she used a pepper ball gun, striking Machelle McAtee, David McAtee‘s niece. David McAtee owned the restaurant and died from a single gunshot to the chest. A ballistics report found the bullet fragments had green paint, showing the bullet came from a National Guard member, but the fragment was so destroyed there was no way of knowing whose gun fired the fatal shot. Former officer Katie Crews. (LMPD) Crews admitted to her actions during a plea hearing in Oct. 2022 and pleaded guilty to one misdemeanor count for using unreasonable force. She’s been sentenced to two years of probation, 200 hours of community service and a $5,000 fine. She is no longer part of the Louisville Metro Police Department as part of her plea deal, and she has also forfeited her Kentucky law enforcement certification. “This former Louisville police officer abused her authority as a law enforcement officer and violated the victim’s civil rights,” said Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division in a statement. “This sentence makes clear that law enforcement officials are not above the law. The Justice Department will continue to prosecute law enforcement officials who violate our federal civil rights laws and defy the public trust by using excessive force.” Crews was originally charged with a felony and faced as many as 10 years in prison.  The FBI and the Louisville Metro Police Department’s Public Integrity Unit investigated the case through the Louisville Public Corruption Civil Rights Task Force. Related Stories

David McAtee’s family settles wrongful death lawsuit with Louisville – Courier-Journal

By |2023-01-30T20:42:19-05:00January 30th, 2023|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

More than two and a half years after Louisville barbecue stand owner David McAtee was killed by law enforcement officers during the first nights of the 2020 protests, a wrongful death lawsuit his family filed in the aftermath of the shooting has been settled.Steve Romines, an attorney for McAtee's family, told The Courier Journal on Monday that the case had been settled for $725,000. The two sides came to an agreement last week, he said."The family wanted the case over," the attorney said. "… They had no desire to litigate the case for another several years."The lawsuit was initially filed the lawsuit against Louisville Metro Police, the Kentucky National Guard and two LMPD officers in September 2020 on behalf of Odessa Riley, McAtee's mother, and Machelle McAtee, his niece. The plaintiffs said overuse of force and mistakes made by officers and National Guard members on the scene the night of the shooting were in violation of several department policies and ultimately led to McAtee's death.Background:Minute by minute: What happened the night David McAtee was killedFor Courier Journal subscribers:Rapid bus routes & light rail: Will TARC's plans for the future mean a new Louisville tax?McAtee was killed in the early morning hours of June 1, 2020, after protests over the police killing of Breonna Taylor had taken place throughout the day around Louisville. LMPD officers and soldiers with the National Guard, which had been dispatched in the city that day on orders from Gov. Andy Beshear, were sent to the site to break up a small crowd that had gathered after curfew at Dino's Food Mart, a business at Broadway and 26th Street where McAtee operated a small barbecue stand.Katie Crews, an LMPD officer at the time, fired several pepper balls at a group of people in the crowd, including Machelle McAtee, who was hit. David McAtee fired back with a 9 mm handgun and was subsequently shot and killed, with two LMPD officers and two National Guard members firing at him. Then-LMPD Chief Steve Conrad was fired following the shooting after it was determined none of the officers were wearing body cameras at the time.Crews was later charged with unreasonable force for her role in the shooting and was fired in February 2022 after being placed on administrative leave immediately after the shooting. She was sentenced to two years of probation, 200 hours of community service and a $5,000 fine on Monday by U.S. District Judge Benjamin Beaton and has also agreed to surrender her law enforcement certifications.More headlines:This Kentucky restaurant ranks on Yelp's list of top 100 eateries for 2023Reach Lucas Aulbach at laulbach@courier-journal.com.

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