Former LMPD officer in David McAtee case may plead guilty, face less prison time

By |2022-09-20T19:05:09-04:00September 20th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

The former Louisville Metro Police officer charged with unreasonable use of force in the lead-up to West End barbecue stand owner David McAtee’s death in 2020 may plead guilty to a misdemeanor instead of a felony in her federal case and thus avoid a longer prison sentence. As a result, federal prosecutors indicated Tuesday in a superseding indictment that she may get up to one year in prison instead of the 10-year sentence she initially faced. Former officer Katie Crews was indicted in March on one count of deprivation of rights under color of law after a grand jury found she “willfully deprived” McAtee’s niece, Machelle McAtee, of her constitutional right "to be free from an unreasonable seizure, which includes the right to be free from the use of unreasonable force by a law enforcement officer." The indictment from the U.S. Department of Justice did not name Machelle McAtee but said that on June 1, 2020, Crews “fired a pepperball at M.M., striking M.M., while M.M. was standing on private property and not posing a threat to (Crews) or others.” The nonlethal pepperball projectile caused “bodily harm” to the victim. Crews, of Jeffersonville, Indiana, was 29 at the time of her indictment and initially pleaded not guilty in March. She waseventually released on a $25,000 unsecured bond, according to court records. During a status conference last week, prosecutors and the ex-officer's attorney, Steve Schroering, agreed to set a change-of-plea hearing for Oct. 11 before U.S. District Judge Benjamin Beaton. Other LMPD cases:These are the ex-Louisville Metro Police officers charged by feds with unlawful forceThe federal government indicated in a superseding indictment filed Tuesday she could face up to one year in prison and/or a $100,000 fine and up to a year of supervised release. She initially faced a maximum of 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release and $250,000 fine.Schroering, who often represents current and former LMPD personnel in legal matters, declined to comment.Crews was on paid administrative leave from June 1, 2020, until LMPD fired her in February 2022 following internal investigations into her actions and also into a Facebook post published days before the McAtee shooting in which she celebrated a protester getting shot by pepperballs, according to the department. Crews was among the LMPD officers and Kentucky National Guard members who responded shortly after midnight on that June night to a crowd that had gathered near David “YaYa” McAtee’s barbecue stand at 26th Street and West Broadway after a 9 p.m. curfew that Mayor Greg Fischer put in place amid protests over Breonna Taylor's killing. The night would end with National Guard and LMPD personnel shooting and killing David McAtee, with investigators determining the fatal shot came from a National Guard member. David McAtee was 53 years old. Fischer fired LMPD Chief Steve Conrad after learning the officers did not have their body cameras on during the shooting. A lawsuit later filed on behalf of David McAtee’s mother and niece describes the scene of YaYa’s BBQ that summer as a safe haven in the West End, blocks away from downtown protests and unrest over the police killings of Black Americans like Taylor and George Floyd that had begun a few days earlier. "There were no known protestors at the location, and no law enforcement intelligence suggested that violent protestors were meeting up in the area," says the pending lawsuit. But now-former LMPD Lt. Josh Judah allegedly then called the department’s command center and, per the lawsuit and reports, told officials, “Check out what we're about to do,” before National Guard and LMPD personnel moved in to clear a crowd mostly gathered in the Dino’s Food Mart parking lot across the street from McAtee’s barbecue business. Machelle McAtee previously told The Courier Journal she was standing in the doorway of her uncle's shop just after midnight when she was hit at close range with at least three projectiles before her uncle pulled her inside. Video footage from a neighboring business shows Crews standing at the fence line shooting projectiles at McAtee's door, even though no one was outside. Machelle McAtee contends Crews did not give her any verbal commands. Crews later admitted to investigators she had fired at Machelle McAtee that night."She was standing, I wouldn’t say in an aggressive manner, but … she was not going to go inside," Crews told investigators five days after the incident."After giving her verbal commands, I did shoot more pepper balls in her direction. She still refused, so I did shoot off more.”After Crews fired the pepper balls, a rush of people from the street pushed their way into the kitchen of YaYa's BBQ, where David McAtee lived and worked, sometimes feeding police officers on the beat, according to those who knew him.Interior surveillance footage shows that after pulling his niece inside from the doorway, David McAtee leaned out the door, fired his handgun twice above his shoulder and was almost immediately hit by return fire. An investigation determined the bullet from a Kentucky National Guard member killed him instantly, though another Guard member and two LMPD officers, Crews and Officer Austin Allen, also fired their weapons. In May 2021, Jefferson Commonwealth’s Attorney Thomas Wine announced he would not prosecute the two Guard members or LMPD officers for firing weapons that night. He said Crews violated department policies, but her actions didn't rise to the level of a crime. Along with Crews, at least three other now-former LMPD officers have faced federal charges since 2020 that relate to the unlawful use of force against civilians. Breonna Taylor case:Trial for ex-LMPD Detective Brett Hankison in Breonna Taylor case delayed nearly a yearIn addition, the DOJ announced indictments in August against four LMPD personnel accused of lying on the drug-related search warrant or recklessly firing bullets into a neighboring apartment during the raid that brought police to Taylor’s South End apartment in March 2020. The raid, which would go on to garner international attention, resulted in the officers fatally shooting Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency room technician, after her boyfriend fired a warning shot at the group he said he thought were intruders, not police.  No drugs or money were found in Taylor’s home. Reporter Kala Kachmar contributed to this story. Reach Billy Kobin at bkobin@courierjournal.com 

These are the ex-Louisville Metro Police officers charged by feds with unlawful force

By |2022-09-20T05:46:29-04:00September 20th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

As the U.S. Department of Justice conducts its investigation into the patterns and practices of Louisville Metro Police and Metro Government, several former LMPD officers have faced federal charges since 2020 that relate to unlawful uses of force but are unrelated to the death of Breonna Taylor.The following is a rundown of the former department personnel who have faced or are still facing criminal cases in federal court, along with one cop who was under investigation but has yet to face charges. (The list does not include Brett Hankison and three other ex-LMPD officers who face charges in connection with Taylor's killing.)Katie CrewsThe former LMPD officer at the center of the fatal shooting of West End barbecue chef David McAtee was charged in March 2022 with depriving McAtee's niece of her constitutional rights "to be free from an unreasonable seizure, which includes the right to be free from the use of unreasonable force by a law enforcement officer," according to the DOJ.Crews was among the LMPD officers and Kentucky National Guard members who responded to a crowd just after midnight on June 1, 2020, that had gathered after a city-implemented curfew at Dino's Food Mart near McAtee's barbecue stand at 26th Street and West Broadway amid protests over Breonna Taylor's killing. Some witnesses who were in the Dino's parking lot or with McAtee as he cooked that night noted they were not actively participating in the protests, which were focused several blocks away in downtown Louisville.Crews, of Jeffersonville, Indiana, is accused of firing pepper ball projectiles, a "less lethal" weapon, at M.M. while they were on private property and did not pose a threat to Crews or other officers at the scene. M.M. is not named in the indictment, but McAtee's niece, Machelle McAtee, previously told investigators Crews had injured her by shooting pepper balls at her while police were dispersing the crowd.Crews later admitted to investigators she had fired at Machelle McAtee that night."She was standing, I wouldn’t say in an aggressive manner, but … she was not going to go inside," Crews described to investigators five days after the incident."After giving her verbal commands, I did shoot more pepper balls in her direction. She still refused, so I did shoot off more.”Potential punishment for Crews include 10 years of imprisonment, three years supervised release and a $250,000 fine.Crews was on paid administrative leave from June 1, 2020, until LMPD fired her in February 2022. Crews appealed her firing to the city's Police Merit Board but requested the hearing be put on hold until her federal case is resolved.LMPD's Professional Standards Unit found Katie Crews violated three policies related to the McAtee incident: body camera procedures, de-escalation and use of chemical agents, according to her termination letter.A separate internal investigation related to a Facebook post in which Crews celebrated a protester being shot by pepper balls found she also violated policies on using social media and police conduct.She appeared Sept. 15, 2022, for a status conference, and attorneys indicated a change of plea hearing is likely this fall.Bryan Wilson and Curt FlynnThe two former LMPD officers were convicted in June 2022 of federal civil rights violations related to throwing drinks from their unmarked squad cars at people in Louisville's West End.Wilson, 36, and Flynn, 40, both pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to violate the civil rights of Louisville pedestrians through the arbitrary use of force, according to the Department of Justice. Wilson also pleaded guilty in a cyberstalking case, in which he threatened to publish compromising photos or videos of at least six females unless they provided additional compromising material.They are both scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 30. Wilson faces a combined maximum penalty of 15 years in prison in his two cases, while Flynn faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.Brett Hankison:Trial for ex-LMPD detective in Breonna Taylor case delayed nearly a yearAfter his federal conviction, Wilson resigned from LMPD. As for Flynn, Chief Erika Erika Shields said he resigned in July 2020 due to a separate criminal investigation.Both Wilson and Flynn were working as detectives in the Ninth Mobile Division from August 2018 through September 2019 when they threw large beverages, including the container, at civilians who were walking, according to a release from the Department of Justice.The two — joined by others who were not named in the release — threw the drinks while dressed in LMPD uniforms and driving unmarked police vehicles. When they identified a target, they'd drive their LMPD vehicles closer to the person before throwing the drinks after announcing on the police radio that "someone was thirsty," or "thirsty fam," the DOJ release said.After throwing the beverage, the driver of the LMPD vehicle would flee the scene. On many occasions, people were hit with the beverage and on at least one occasion, a person was knocked down after being hit, according to the DOJ.The assaults were also recorded either by the detectives or others participating, "sometimes from inside the car from which the beverage was thrown, and sometimes from an LMPD car following closely behind the car from which the beverage was thrown," the DOJ said."Wilson subsequently displayed these videos to other members of the LMPD Ninth Mobile Unit," according to the DOJ. The behavior of the officers became public in June 2021, when Shields said the FBI was investigating, calling it "another black eye to the department." Jefferson Circuit Judge Jessica Green, who previously served as the Metro Council representative for District 1, which includes West End neighborhoods, had said the victims included Black residents who were homeless.Cory Evans (already sentenced)Cory Evans, who had been an officer for about seven years before resigning from the department in July 2021 after LMPD initiated his termination, was sentenced in February 2022 to two years in prison for beating an unarmed, kneeling protester on the head with a wooden riot stick and then repeatedly lying to his superiors about it.Evans had pleaded guilty in 2021 to deprivation of rights under color of law in connection with the May 31, 2020, assault of Marty Chester, which occurred in the early days of the racial justice protests in Louisville.Chester suffered a gash on his head, needed three staples and lost his hearing for several months. He also said at the sentencing hearing he had experienced anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder since the assault.Evans said he was "embarrassed" by what he'd done during a night of protests that another officer described as "pure chaos," then apologized for his actions and for having "drug (LMPD's) name through the mud."But in an interview with WAVE3 News published soon after his sentencing hearing, the ex-officer struck a different tone, describing the moment when "the feds say that I struck him.""I don't deny that he was hit," Evans said. "I deny that I hit him with the intent or malice."Brian Butler, the attorney for Evans, argued in court that Chester was in a group of people reportedly committing arson and throwing bricks that night.But Assistant U.S. Attorney Amanda Gregory reminded the court that Chester was not on trial. While Chester was arrested that night, his charge was ultimately dismissed and expunged, Gregory said, and no officer claimed to have seen him throw bricks or start fires. In addition to the two years in prison, Evans must also pay $1,962.85 in restitution.Reach Billy Kobin at bkobin@courierjournal.com

Change of plea to be entered for former LMPD officer facing charges in death of David McAtee

By |2022-09-15T23:08:55-04:00September 15th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

The former Louisville Metro Police officer facing federal charges in connection with events that led to David McAtee's death is changing her plea.Katie Crews was among the LMPD and National Guard members dispersing a crowd at the corner of 26th Street and Broadway in June of 2020 when protests erupted over Breonna Taylor's death.She was accused of firing pepper balls at McAtee's niece as she stood in the doorway of his restaurant.That's when the federal indictment said McAtee fired off two shots which then led to police and National Guard returning fire and killing him.In federal court Thursday afternoon, the judge asked United States prosecutors and Crews' attorney if they were ready to talk about trial dates.That's when the Department of Justice said that they had approved a change of plea.The judge asked Crews' attorney if he agreed to the change of plea, and he affirmed the action.Crews' attorney had no comment on why the change was being entered when asked by WLKY.A federal grand jury indicted Crews with depravation of rights under color of law for allegedly violating the civil rights of McAtee's niece when she fired at her.The documents say she was on private property and not posing a threat.The judge then set the change of plea date to Oct. 11. That is when more on the reason for the change will be revealed.Crews is the only person thus far to be charged in the death of McAtee.Previous story on the federal charges: Ex-LMPD officer involved in David McAtee's death faces federal charge LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The former Louisville Metro Police officer facing federal charges in connection with events that led to David McAtee's death is changing her plea.Katie Crews was among the LMPD and National Guard members dispersing a crowd at the corner of 26th Street and Broadway in June of 2020 when protests erupted over Breonna Taylor's death.

Why charges will not be dropped against hundreds of Breonna Taylor protesters in Kentucky

By |2022-09-09T18:04:23-04:00September 9th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Jefferson County's top prosecutor will not drop charges against Breonna Taylor protesters whose cases are still making their way through court, despite renewed calls to do so.On Wednesday, several protest organizers met at Jefferson Square Park to demand all remaining cases be dismissed, stating new information that continues to be uncovered around Taylor's death shows Louisville police have repeatedly lied to the community and investigators.But in a statement, County Attorney Mike O'Connell said the outstanding protest-related cases do not meet his office's "criteria for dismissal" and will continue to be prosecuted.His office previously reviewed more than 1,000 protest arrests made between 2020 and 2021 and dismissed 70% of them, according to a Courier Journal analysis. But it has moved forward with more than 200 cases involving violence, threats of violence, property damage and road blocking."This consistent approach to prosecuting these cases ensures the public that every member of our community is treated fairly and equally before the law," O'Connell said.Background:Why most protesters arrested by Louisville police will never be convicted of a crimeProtest organizer Chris Will, however, said nothing about Taylor's case or the protest-related arrests has been fair."I can show time and time and time again how the law doesn't work in our favor, period," he said.Several Louisville Metro Police officers have been federally charged for protest-related incidents, including former officers Cory Evans, who was found to have bludgeoned a kneeling demonstrator, and Katie Crews, who was accused of unreasonable use of force leading up to the fatal shooting of West End barbecue stand owner David McAtee.Will and others who spoke Wednesday also pointed to new documents that allege Detective Sgt. Kyle Meany hid information from other officers before they served a no-knock warrant at Taylor's apartment, where she was shot and killed.Meany is one of four officers that were recently indicted by the U.S. Department of Justice for violating Taylor's civil rights.Latest:LMPD cop hid info that Taylor's boyfriend was at apartment, had gun permit, government saysAccording to court records, Meany surveilled Taylor's apartment two days before the warrant was served, saw her boyfriend Kenneth Walker's car parked nearby and discovered he had a concealed carry permit. But even though that made the search riskier, Meany did not tell the team of detectives who executed it, nor did he insist it be included in the application for the search warrant.On March 13, 2020, Taylor was fatally shot by Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove after Walker, believing the couple was being robbed, fired one shot from the apartment that struck Mattingly in the leg."We told you from the very beginning follow the warrant," poet and activist Hannah Drake said Wednesday. "... You called us thugs. You called us losers. We were the ones that were ruining this city. We didn't break the contract with this city."Y'all are concerned about some broken windows. I'm concerned about the broken trust in this community. Every window is fixed. How do you fix Tamika Palmer? How do you fix Kenneth Walker?"About 170 protest-related cases remain open, with about a third involving defendants who failed to appear in court.Two dozen others are linked to a demonstration that shut down the Clark Memorial Bridge in June 2020. Last month, Jefferson District Judge Anne Haynie ruled the 26-member group could stand trial together over objections from the protesters' defense attorneys.That trial is scheduled for Nov. 3.Andrew Wolfson contributed to this report.Reach reporter Bailey Loosemore at bloosemore@courier-journal.com, 502-582-4646 or on Twitter @bloosemore.

Why charges will not be dropped against hundreds of Breonna Taylor – EMEA Tribune

By |2022-09-09T20:53:46-04:00September 9th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Jefferson County’s top prosecutor will not drop charges against Breonna Taylor protesters whose cases are still making their way through court, despite renewed calls to do so. On Wednesday, several protest organizers met at Jefferson Square Park to demand all remaining cases be dismissed, stating new information that continues to be uncovered around Taylor’s death shows Louisville police have repeatedly lied to the community and investigators. But in a statement, County Attorney Mike O’Connell said the outstanding protest-related cases do not meet his office’s “criteria for dismissal” and will continue to be prosecuted.Advertisement His office previously reviewed more than 1,000 protest arrests made between 2020 and 2021 and dismissed 70% of them, according to a Courier Journal analysis. But it has moved forward with more than 200 cases involving violence, threats of violence, property damage and road blocking. “This consistent approach to prosecuting these cases ensures the public that every member of our community is treated fairly and equally before the law,” O’Connell said. Background:Why most protesters arrested by Louisville police will never be convicted of a crimeAdvertisement Protest organizer Chris Will, however, said nothing about Taylor’s case or the protest-related arrests has been fair. “I can show time and time and time again how the law doesn’t work in our favor, period,” he said. Several Louisville Metro Police officers have been federally charged for protest-related incidents, including former officers Cory Evans, who was found to have bludgeoned a kneeling demonstrator, and Katie Crews, who was accused of unreasonable use of force leading up to the fatal shooting of West End barbecue stand owner David McAtee.Advertisement Will and others who spoke Wednesday also pointed to new documents that allege Detective Sgt. Kyle Meany hid information from other officers before they served a no-knock warrant at Taylor’s apartment, where she was shot and killed. Meany is one of four officers that were recently indicted by the U.S. Department of Justice for violating Taylor’s civil rights. Latest:LMPD cop hid info that Taylor’s boyfriend was at apartment, had gun permit, government saysAdvertisement According to court records, Meany surveilled Taylor’s apartment two days before the warrant was served, saw her boyfriend Kenneth Walker’s car parked nearby and discovered he had a concealed carry permit. But even though that made the search riskier, Meany did not tell the team of detectives who executed it, nor did he insist it be included in the application for the search warrant. On March 13, 2020, Taylor was fatally shot by Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove after Walker, believing the couple was being robbed, fired one shot from the apartment that struck Mattingly in the leg. “We told you from the very beginning follow the warrant,” poet and activist Hannah Drake said Wednesday. “… You called us thugs. You called us losers. We were the ones that were ruining this city. We didn’t break the contract with this city.Advertisement “Y’all are concerned about some broken windows. I’m concerned about the broken trust in this community. Every window is fixed. How do you fix Tamika Palmer? How do you fix Kenneth Walker?” About 170 protest-related cases remain open, with about a third involving defendants who failed to appear in court. Two dozen others are linked to a demonstration that shut down the Clark Memorial Bridge in June 2020. Last month, Jefferson District Judge Anne Haynie ruled the 26-member group could stand trial together over objections from the protesters’ defense attorneys.Advertisement That trial is scheduled for Nov. 3. Andrew Wolfson contributed to this report. Reach reporter Bailey Loosemore at [email protected], 502-582-4646 or on Twitter @bloosemore.Advertisement This article originally appeared on Louisville Courier Journal: Why Louisville prosecutor won’t drop Breonna Taylor protest cases Source Advertisement

Louisville prosecutor refuses to drop charges against Breonna Taylor protesters

By |2022-09-09T03:43:38-04:00September 9th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Even though it took authorities more than two years to begin termination procedures for two officers charged in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor, a prosecutor in Louisville said Thursday he has no intention of dropping charges against those protesting her death. These are the same protesters who say that it was the police who have continuously lied to the community and investigators about Taylor’s death.The Louisville Courier Journal reports that Jefferson County Attorney Mike O'Connell claims that the cases against the protesters have not met his “criteria for dismissal,” and his office will move forward with prosecutions."This consistent approach to prosecuting these cases ensures the public that every member of our community is treated fairly and equally be for the law," O'Connell said.Taylor, 26, was an emergency medical technician. She was killed when police raided her home while executing an illegally obtained no-knock warrant on Mar. 13, 2020, in Louisville, Kentucky.Taylor wasn't the subject of the warrant and was sleeping when officers rammed through her door."I can show time and time and time again how the law doesn't work in our favor, period," protest organizer Chris Will told the Courier Journal.Louisville Metro Police officer Cory Evans was federally charged for bludgeoning an unarmed protester with a wooden riot stick while the person was kneeling, and officer Katie Crews was charged federally with unreasonable use of force after the shooting death of David McAtee, a local barbecue stand owner.So far, about 70% of the 1,000 cases against the protesters—charged variously with blocking roadways, property damage, and threats of violence—have been dropped, but around 300 remain active.Detective Sgt. Kyle Meany, one of four officers recently terminated by the Louisville Metro police department, is being accused by Will and others of concealing information to other officers about the no-knock warrant that ultimately led to Taylor’s death, the Courier Journal reports.Court records found that for several days, Meany was surveilling Taylor’s apartment and knew that her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, had a concealed carry permit. Meany neglected to inform the detectives executing the search warrant at the apartment about the concealed permit.On Wednesday, poet and activist Hannah Drake called out prosecutors and the police department, saying, "You called us thugs. You called us losers. We were the ones that were ruining this city. We didn't break the contract with this city.”"Y'all are concerned about some broken windows. I'm concerned about the broken trust in this community. Every window is fixed. How do you fix Tamika Palmer? How do you fix Kenneth Walker?"

Findings From DOJ Investigation Into Louisville Police Department Expected Within Weeks …

By |2022-09-08T18:27:41-04:00September 8th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

click to enlarge Kathryn Harrington A painting of Breonna Taylor in downtown Louisville's Jefferson Square Park in March 2022 The findings of a wide-ranging Department of Justice investigation into the Louisville Metro Department of Police are expected “in the coming weeks,” the city’s mayor and police chief said in an op-ed published by The Courier Journal on Wednesday.Department of Justice investigation into Louisville Metro Police Department“In the coming weeks, we expect the DOJ will release its investigation letter so we can compare its findings to the work we have completed and get to work on open issues,” wrote Mayor Greg Fischer and LMPD Chief Erika Shields in the Courier-Journal op-ed. The DOJ announced its investigation into LMPD in April of last year, saying they were looking into whether the department “engages in a pattern or practice of using unreasonable force” and “whether LMPD engages in unconstitutional stops, searches, and seizures; as well as whether the department unlawfully executes search warrants on private homes.” The investigation came after the 2020 police killing of Breonna Taylor and a heavy-handed LMPD response to protesters who later took to the streets as a result of her death. It is widely expected that, as a result of the DOJ findings, LMPD will come under federal consent decree, a monitored agreement between the city and federal government that would see changes to the way the police department operates. Wednesday’s op-ed, and a separate press release from the mayor’s office, touted numerous reforms undertaken by the city and LMPD since Taylor’s killing, including the hiring of a “reform-minded” chief in Shields, the addition of an “Accountability and Improvement Bureau” to LMPD and the creation of the Office of the Inspector General, which has the ability to investigate alleged police misconduct. “In April 2021, when the Department of Justice announced its investigation into LMPD, we committed to full cooperation. But we have not waited on the DOJ findings to continue our reforms,” the op-ed read. Louisville consent decree City officials have previously said that by getting ahead of reforms, Louisville could shorten a potential consent decree. Consent decrees frequently drag on for years, straining the patience of the public, city government and police; the New Orleans Police Department has been under one for a decade. The op-ed from the mayor and police chief also appeared to express gratitude towards the protesters who took to the street following Taylor’s killing. “Our thanks also to the people who never stopped demanding justice for Breonna Taylor. They ensured her name will live as a symbol of the never-ending quest for justice and strong police-community relations,” they said. However, friction between the community and LMPD has lingered as more details about officer misconduct have continued to emerge, with six former officers being hit with federal charges this year alone. Last month, four former LMPD officers were federally charged in relation to Taylor’s killing. So far, one of those officers, Detective Kelly Goodlett, has plead guilty, admitting that she and another officer knowingly lied in the warrant application for Taylor’s apartment. A pattern of bad behavior from Louisville Police Another two officers are set to be sentenced later this month on federal charges for incidents where they allegedly threw drinks at pedestrians from unmarked police cars and filmed their exploits. One of those officers was also charged with hacking computer applications of six women and extracting compromising photographs. He would then contact the women via text message and threaten to publish the photos if they did not provide him with more. And in March, former LMPD officer Katie Crews was federally charged for firing pepper balls in the moments before West End BBQ chef David McAtee was killed at 26th and Broadway.In their op-ed on Wednesday, Shields and Fischer said they were committed to “working on a community that is pro-police and pro-reform, where we come together to create safe, thriving neighborhoods.” In an apparent effort to bridge the divide between the community and the police, they also announced an “online community conversation” about reform efforts set to take place on the mayor’s Facebook page on Saturday, Sept. 10 at 2 p.m. This story was originally published by CityBeat sister publication LEO Weekly.

Louisville prosecutor refuses to drop charges against Breonna Taylor protesters – Daily Kos

By |2022-09-08T18:27:43-04:00September 8th, 2022|David McAtee|

Taylor, 26, was an emergency medical technician. She was killed when police raided her home while executing an illegally obtained no-knock warrant on Mar. 13, 2020, in Louisville, Kentucky. Taylor wasn't the subject of the warrant and was sleeping when officers rammed through her door. "I can show time and time and time again how the law doesn't work in our favor, period," protest organizer Chris Will told the Courier Journal. Louisville Metro Police officer Cory Evans was federally charged for bludgeoning an unarmed protester with a wooden riot stick while the person was kneeling, and officer Katie Crews was charged federally with unreasonable use of force after the shooting death of David McAtee, a local barbecue stand owner. So far, about 70% of the 1,000 cases against the protesters—charged variously with blocking roadways, property damage, and threats of violence—have been dropped, but around 300 remain active. Detective Sgt. Kyle Meany, one of four officers recently terminated by the Louisville Metro police department, is being accused by Will and others of concealing information to other officers about the no-knock warrant that ultimately led to Taylor’s death, the Courier Journal reports. Court records found that for several days, Meany was surveilling Taylor’s apartment and knew that her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, had a concealed carry permit. Meany neglected to inform the detectives executing the search warrant at the apartment about the concealed permit. On Wednesday, poet and activist Hannah Drake called out prosecutors and the police department, saying, "You called us thugs. You called us losers. We were the ones that were ruining this city. We didn't break the contract with this city.” "Y'all are concerned about some broken windows. I'm concerned about the broken trust in this community. Every window is fixed. How do you fix Tamika Palmer? How do you fix Kenneth Walker?"

Despite renewed calls, County Attorney unlikely to drop charges against protesters – WFPL

By |2022-09-08T19:35:23-04:00September 8th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Racial justice advocates are calling on the Jefferson County Attorney’s office to drop all legal action against protesters from 2020. Their renewed demands follow the release of new information this week about the deadly raid on Breonna Taylor’s home.  Federal court documents outline details that former Louisville Metro Police Detective Kelly Goodlett shared with prosecutors. In a plea agreement, she admitted to using false information in the warrant application for Taylor’s home and lying to cover it up afterward, among other things. At a rally Wednesday, poet and spoken word artist Hannah Drake said LMPD’s lies and negligence are why people marched the city’s streets seeking justice for Taylor.  “None of us would have been out here. None of us. We risked everything in a pandemic. Got sick, lost our friends, broken relationships, broken friendships,” Drake said. “We didn’t break the contract with this city. Y’all are concerned about some broken windows. I’m concerned about the broken trust in this community. Every window is fixed…the city broke me. It broke everybody.” Drake said the city’s actions and a lack of accountability carries a heavy toll with resounding consequences — including a number of lives lost.  “Breonna Taylor’s dead. Kris Smith is dead. Travis Nagdy is dead. Tyler Gerth is dead. David McAtee is dead. Chris Wells is dead. How many more people are gonna die because of LMPD?” Chris Will is one of thousands of people who marched the streets demanding justice for Taylor in 2020. He echoed Drake’s message during the gathering at Jefferson Square Park.  “You can’t call us thugs and losers and rioters because those rioters are in that building, right? The murderers are in that building right there. And all the charges need to be dropped,” Will said. “One lie started all of this. One lie. Deception, cover up after cover up…no transparency.” In an email to WFPL News, Jefferson County Attorney Mike O’Connell said his office has conducted a review of the nearly 1,000 protest arrests. While he said prosecutors have dismissed most of the cases, the hundreds remaining don’t meet guidelines for dismissal.  “They involve instances of violence or the threat of violence, destruction of property, or interference with streets and roadways,” O’Connell said. “We have or will make offers to resolve all remaining cases. We respect every person’s right to take their case to a jury if they so choose. We will be ready for trial and we will respect the determination of the jury.”

Why charges will not be dropped against hundreds of Breonna Taylor protesters

By |2022-09-08T12:28:02-04:00September 8th, 2022|Breonna Taylor, David McAtee|

Jefferson County's top prosecutor will not drop charges against Breonna Taylor protesters whose cases are still making their way through court, despite renewed calls to do so.On Wednesday, several protest organizers met at Jefferson Square Park to demand all remaining cases be dismissed, stating new information that continues to be uncovered around Taylor's death shows Louisville police have repeatedly lied to the community and investigators.But in a statement, County Attorney Mike O'Connell said the outstanding protest-related cases do not meet his office's "criteria for dismissal" and will continue to be prosecuted.His office previously reviewed more than 1,000 protest arrests made between 2020 and 2021 and dismissed 70% of them, the statement said. But it has moved forward with about 300 cases involving violence, threats of violence, property damage and road blocking."This consistent approach to prosecuting these cases ensures the public that every member of our community is treated fairly and equally be for the law," O'Connell said.Background:Why most protesters arrested by Louisville police will never be convicted of a crimeProtest organizer Chris Will, however, said nothing about Taylor's case or the protest-related arrests has been fair."I can show time and time and time again how the law doesn't work in our favor, period," he said.Several Louisville Metro Police officers have been federally charged for protest-related incidents, including former officers Cory Evans, who was found to have bludgeoned a kneeling demonstrator, and Katie Crews, who was accused of unreasonable use of force leading up to the fatal shooting of West End barbecue stand owner David McAtee.Will and others who spoke Wednesday also pointed to new documents that allege Detective Sgt. Kyle Meany hid information from other officers before they served a no-knock warrant at Taylor's apartment, where she was shot and killed.Meany is one of four officers that were recently indicted by the U.S. Department of Justice for violating Taylor's civil rights.Latest:LMPD cop hid info that Taylor's boyfriend was at apartment, had gun permit, government saysAccording to court records, Meany surveilled Taylor's apartment two days before the warrant was served, saw her boyfriend Kenneth Walker's car parked nearby and discovered he had a concealed carry permit. But even though that made the search riskier, Meany did not tell the team of detectives who executed it, nor did he insist it be included in the application for the search warrant.On March 13, 2020, Taylor was fatally shot by Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove after Walker, believing the couple was being robbed, fired one shot from the apartment that struck Mattingly in the leg."We told you from the very beginning follow the warrant," poet and activist Hannah Drake said Wednesday. "... You called us thugs. You called us losers. We were the ones that were ruining this city. We didn't break the contract with this city."Y'all are concerned about some broken windows. I'm concerned about the broken trust in this community. Every window is fixed. How do you fix Tamika Palmer? How do fix Kenneth Walker?"About 200 protest-related cases remain open, including two dozen linked to a demonstration that shut down the Clark Memorial Bridge in June 2020.Last month, Jefferson District Judge Anne Haynie ruled the 26-member group could stand trial together over objections from the protesters' defense attorneys.That trial is scheduled for Nov. 3.Andrew Wolfson contributed to this report.Reach reporter Bailey Loosemore at bloosemore@courier-journal.com, 502-582-4646 or on Twitter @bloosemore.

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